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A FEAST IN ROME
Samuel Chamberlain
December 21, 1959
A noted food authority invites you to a gastronomic tour of the Olympic City to prepare you for the many delights and varied surprises of the Italian cucina
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December 21, 1959

A Feast In Rome

A noted food authority invites you to a gastronomic tour of the Olympic City to prepare you for the many delights and varied surprises of the Italian cucina

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Restaurants will offer you a superb single peach on a plate, if you choose, but the average Roman prefers his fruit cut up with a spot of maraschino. Macedonia di frutta, a sublimation of our fruit cup, is one of the most popular Roman desserts in summer. Practically every menu features it, sometimes with ice cream added. A final delicacy, found in the upper echelon of restaurants, is fragole di bosco alla panna, wild strawberries from the forest with rich cream. Accompanied by a not-too-dry bottle of Asti Spumante, this makes a crowning dessert to any meal.

DOLCI
Desserts

If space still remains in the dinner guest after the foregoing rounds of plenitude, the Roman restaurants have a few luscious desserts to offer him before he sinks back to confront a caff� espresso and a discreet glass of liqueur. He will find various types of cake (torta) and ice cream (gelati), sometimes in the exotic form of a cassata alla siciliana. Combining cake and cream, an Italian pastry chef comes up with a gaudy mound of plenty called Saint-Honor�, and a rich concoction going under the preposterous name of zuppa inglese, or English soup. Or would you have omelette alla fiamma, an omelet flaming in liqueurs, or a pesca Melba, a peach you-know-how? Several restaurants offer them, together with zabaione, the famous dessert made with egg yolks, sugar and Marsala, and served in a tall glass. Finally, there is monte bianco, an impressive mound of chesnut pur�e crowned with heavy cream, and, for less robust digestions, that international dessert with a familiar name—crema caramella, caramel custard.

The foregoing composite of restaurant delicacies, from the first glimpse of the antipasti to the last lingering morsel of dolce, is by no means complete. However, it does include the major Roman dishes, and it is sufficiently detailed, we hope, to permit you to scan a Roman menu with a knowing eye. As you take your place at a hospitable Roman table, we wish you happiness and buon appetito.

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