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SEVEN THAT SHOCKED
Kenneth Rudeen
December 07, 1959
Fans were baffled—happily or sadly—by some teams in 1959. But every football miracle has its explanation
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December 07, 1959

Seven That Shocked

Fans were baffled—happily or sadly—by some teams in 1959. But every football miracle has its explanation

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Even had Hayes's best quarterbacks, Jerry Fields and Tom Matte, and his big All-America fullback, Bob White, not suffered limiting injuries, he would have been sweating, for the Big Ten had struck its best balance in years. An early-season flutter at wide-open football was as futile as Hayes's bedrock ground-it-out game; Ohio State collapsed to its worst record (3-5-1) since grim 1947.

IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST. Above all, the Huskies are a team. But last year, when they lost no fewer than seven games, they were a team, too. There were no All-Americas at Seattle in 1958; there are none now. What most people failed to notice before was that Washington lost many of its games by close scores. What practically everybody was conscious of this year was that Washington was led by a one-eyed quarterback, Bob Schloredt, who got into the leading traces when First-stringer Bob Hivner was hurt. Schloredt, deprived of the sight of his left eye by a boyhood Fourth of July accident, provided just enough offensive punch to assure that teamwork and that elusive commodity, "heart," would finally bring a Rose Bowl trip to the earnest forces of Jim Owens. Owens never tried to teach showy tactics beyond the Huskies' fairly limited physical capabilities.

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