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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
November 02, 1959
WILDLIFE: CONSERVATIONSirs:Mr. Knight states that predator-control campaigns sponsored by the Bureau of Biological Survey have aided the return of the pronghorn (The Comeback of the American Antelope, SI, Oct. 19). This may be true, but what Mr. Knight doesn't tell us is how these predators are controlled. For the benefit of Mr. Knight and anyone who doesn't know, the method mainly used in the West is poison baiting, which is the greatest disgrace to wildlife conservation in the history of America. Coyotes and bobcats, which provide sport to countless hunters and trappers, are destroyed by a method that provides sport for no one. Millions of dollars worth of fur bearers as well as innocent game and pets are lost. Surely no one can justify such a waste.THOMAS R. BENINSKY Bloomsburg, Pa.
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November 02, 1959

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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WILDLIFE: CONSERVATION
Sirs:
Mr. Knight states that predator-control campaigns sponsored by the Bureau of Biological Survey have aided the return of the pronghorn (The Comeback of the American Antelope, SI, Oct. 19). This may be true, but what Mr. Knight doesn't tell us is how these predators are controlled. For the benefit of Mr. Knight and anyone who doesn't know, the method mainly used in the West is poison baiting, which is the greatest disgrace to wildlife conservation in the history of America. Coyotes and bobcats, which provide sport to countless hunters and trappers, are destroyed by a method that provides sport for no one. Millions of dollars worth of fur bearers as well as innocent game and pets are lost. Surely no one can justify such a waste.
THOMAS R. BENINSKY
Bloomsburg, Pa.

GOLF: DREAM ON
Sirs:
I must say Mr. Jablow's very amusing (and excellently written) article, How to Beat Sam Snead (SI, Oct. 12), does brighten my bleak golfing outlook as I had given up all hope of ever beating our annual company golf champion (who also happens to be my boss). Why, I never dreamed he could be so easy. Do you realize I had him hopelessly beaten by 15—and still had a beautifully hooked four-iron around a palm tree at Miami Springs (mainly because the course we were playing didn't have any palm trees) and half a bottle of beer I never even needed. Mr. Jablow, your name should go down in history with Ben Hogan's as the only men to ever beat the game.
JACK OVERPECK
Dearborn, Mich.

BIRD BANDS AND A RABBIT-FOOT
Sirs:
Gilbert Cant's interesting article on bird banding (When You See This, Act! SI, Oct. 19) is very well written and most informative—a story which should materially help in a better understanding of the study of migrations and enable conservation agencies interested in this wildlife resource to gain greater benefits from their banding efforts.

Our congratulations and thanks for SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S contribution to the wildlife of our nation.
LAWRENCE J. DURKIN
Executive Secretary, Ducks Unlimited
New York City

Sirs:
Your publication of my article on bird banding served as a potent rabbit-foot. Before taking up banding I had been an eager field birder for 20 years, and had taken off at the drop of a feather whenever a friend told me there was a saw-whet owl in a patch of evergreens five to 50 miles away. And for 20 years I was foiled: the bird had always gone, or been killed by a cat or a car, when I got there.

Now I have Japanese mist nets in my garden, and in good weather leave them set overnight. The morning when an early copy of your October 19 issue was due, I checked the nets at 7 a.m. Empty. At 7:30 four birds: a ruby-crowned kinglet, two sparrows—and a saw-whet owl. While it did no good for this Mahomet to go to the mountain, the mountain obligingly came to him.

The saw-whet is the smallest and most retiring owl in eastern North America. It gets its name from its somewhat less than musical voice, which recalls the tooth-jarring sound of a saw being sharpened. Silent in the net and in the hand, the one saw-whet of my belated acquaintance now bears the number 613-80209 on its aluminum leg band.
GILBERT CANT
Mamaroneck, N.Y.

FOOTBALL: BUTTON BUSTIN' PROUD
Sirs:
Hundreds of loyal fans met Oklahoma's Sooners when they returned from their unhappy expedition to Evanston. Fifty-three thousand fans braved flood conditions to be on hand to give them an ovation when they came on the field for the Colorado game on October 3.

Why this loyalty? I suppose different people have different reasons, but my own reason was forcibly brought home to me by your articles on the OU-Northwestern and the Ohio State-Southern Cal games (A Slight Case of Murder, SI, Oct. 5; Thunder from the Herd, SI, Oct. 12). It's probably pretty feminine reasoning, but I guess that's O.K. since I'm a female-type football fan.

We're used to the typically sportsmanlike reaction from Coach Wilkinson, as indicated by the dressing room interview after the game, but how can you help being button-bustin' proud of a team exemplified by an unhappy young Brewster Hobby who, when the reporters tried to put a readymade poison food alibi into his mouth, said, "Naw. We just got our tails beat."

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