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APPLYING THE THREE-BOUNCE RULE TO TENNIS GREATS
February 08, 1960
Bill Talbert, former Davis Cup captain here estimates the effect of the new rule on some famous players' games.
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February 08, 1960

Applying The Three-bounce Rule To Tennis Greats

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Bill Talbert, former Davis Cup captain here estimates the effect of the new rule on some famous players' games.

Maurice McLoughlin, who played back before World War I, is considered the father of the net game. Not strong in the ground game but a tiger at the net, he would have had trouble with the three-bounce rule.

Bill Tilden, even with his "cannonball" service, would have loved the new rule. He was a master stroker from backcourt and was reluctant to move forward. He was able to impart tricky spins and angles and drive his foe to distraction with his changes of pace and steadiness. Before his death, he saw the coming of the Big Game and decried it, predicting the decay of all-round tennis talent.

Ellsworth Vines, brilliant but unpredictable, would have suffered from the three-bounce rule because of his erratic backcourt shot.

Don Budge was the master of all shots—the serve, volley, forehand, backhand. The new rule wouldn't have bothered him at all. Like Tilden, he was so sure of himself and so deadly from any position on the court that he never found it necessary to rush recklessly to the net.

Jack Kramer was a player like Budge, yet it was he who did more than anyone else to popularize the Big Game that he now seeks to modify. If he had played under the three-bounce rule he would have been a consistent winner.

Bobby Riggs, Bitsy Grant, Frank Parker all would have benefited by the curtailment of the volley. Riggs was a marvelous ground-stroke player and Grant and Parker were relentless retrievers and deadly backcourt men.

Pancho Gonzales, like many another good modern player, is strictly a serve and volley man, although his ground strokes have improved during his pro career. The new rule will take some of the zing from his game.

Lew Hoad has an excellent big serve. With his fine ground strokes, he should be bothered less than Gonzales.

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