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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
June 13, 1960
NOW HEAR THISSirs:Your May 30 FOR THE RECORD column carried a line which merits some attention. I refer to the statement that John Kelley, Gordon McKenzie and Alex Breckenridge were "virtually assured" of becoming representatives in the Olympic marathon run.
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June 13, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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NOW HEAR THIS
Sirs:
Your May 30 FOR THE RECORD column carried a line which merits some attention. I refer to the statement that John Kelley, Gordon McKenzie and Alex Breckenridge were "virtually assured" of becoming representatives in the Olympic marathon run.

For the record, the U.S. Olympic Committee has ruled that the three highest finishers in two runs, the Yonkers (NAAU) and Boston marathons, would constitute the Olympic team. Pursuant to this rule, Robert Cons of Culver City, Calif., along with McKenzie and Breckenridge, are the Olympic marathoners in fact. John Kelley, undoubtedly one of America's finest marathon runners, failed to finish the Boston Marathon and, according to the AAU rule, is thereby disqualified from an Olympic team berth in this event.

A number of eastern AAU officials are quietly "pulling strings" to put Kelley on the team and to take Cons off. Cons has had to overcome extremely difficult problems to become the champion he is. He was badly wounded in Korea; he had to compete in the cold climes of the East when used to southern California's warm sun. The Olympic team berth should not be taken from him when he has rightfully won it.

For the record once more, Bobby Cons' friends in southern California—most of them Olympic team contributors—stand ready to fight any move which would keep him from wearing the U.S. emblem in 1960 Olympic marathon run competition.
RUSSELL D. JONES
Culver City, Calif.

?Although the marathon runners have not as yet been officially selected, it seems certain that John Kelley, the record-setting winner of the NAAU run and the U.S.'s best marathoner, will be placed on the team to give the U.S. the strongest possible chance for a gold medal.—ED.

HOME FREE
Sirs:
Thieves descended on a playground at Fairmont, Minn, and made off with home plate as well as the pitching rubber. So bizarre thievery on the sport front continued in this state where the Wirth public golf course in Minneapolis recently lost part of its sixth green (SCORECARD, May 30).
DICK GORDON
Minneapolis

NO HURRY IN HAWAII
Sirs:
It was stated in your SCORECARD of May 23 that in either Honolulu or California (you did not specify where), Herb Elliott ran a half mile in 1:59.4, winning by 70 yards. This means that his nearest competitor did not cover the distance in anything under 2:10, a slow time for even the average high school runner. Who were Elliott's opponents? In California 2:10 is considered a qualifying time for class B kindergarteners.
BILL HEYMAN
Lawrence, N.Y.

?Four University of Hawaii runners were recruited for the occasion. Elliott's time was slow indeed: 6.2 seconds over the best high school mark set in 1959 and 7.1 seconds over Don Bowden's national high school mark. But Elliott was suffering from an inflamed tendon, and the track was suffering from a near cloudburst.—ED.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT
Sirs:
Roy Terrell's remark about the "once deadly Braves" is uncalled for ( Pittsburgh's Gang of Pesky Heroes, May 30). I hope and I think by the end of the season any writer who pans the Braves will have to eat his words.
FRANK J. MARKELC
Milwaukee

ECTOMORPHS, ANYONE?
Sirs:
It is too bad that your writer Kenneth Rudeen finds that most topflight American tennis players are not honest-to-good-ness athletes (Little Man with a Big Wallop, SI, May 16). Obviously, he would define an honest-to-goodness athlete as someone who has "broad shoulders, thick biceps and the wrists and hands of a blacksmith...who would stand out in almost any sport." I myself have such thick biceps that I sometimes frighten myself, yet I would not subscribe to his definition.

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