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OVERWRITTEN DREAM
March 14, 1960
It was like an overwritten dream. Last week he was an amateur goalie at the Winter Olympics. This week he was trying out with the professional New York Rangers. But when the game in Manhattan's Madison Square Garden was over, Jack McCartan had to open his eyes and face facts: the 14,000 New Yorkers up on their feet were applauding him, it was his back—his—that the veteran Rangers were pounding, and he was the upstart rookie who had sent the formidable Detroit Red Wings skulking from the ice, whipped 3-1 by the last-place Rangers.
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March 14, 1960

Overwritten Dream

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It was like an overwritten dream. Last week he was an amateur goalie at the Winter Olympics. This week he was trying out with the professional New York Rangers. But when the game in Manhattan's Madison Square Garden was over, Jack McCartan had to open his eyes and face facts: the 14,000 New Yorkers up on their feet were applauding him, it was his back—his—that the veteran Rangers were pounding, and he was the upstart rookie who had sent the formidable Detroit Red Wings skulking from the ice, whipped 3-1 by the last-place Rangers.

McCartan, who played both hockey and baseball at the University of Minnesota, considers himself a better third baseman than goalie. Certainly a third baseman's quick reflexes were evident as he made 33 saves against Detroit, many with his hands. "He did everything we had hoped for," said Muzz Patrick, Ranger general manager. Said soaped-up, souped-up Jack McCartan from the showers (right): "These Rangers played like hell in front of me. My job was easy."

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