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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
February 29, 1960
LEGENDS, MEMORIES AND THE RECORDSirs: Robert Cantwell's article (The Poet, the Bums and the Legendary Red Men, SI, Feb. 15) on Marianne Moore and the Carlisle Indians brought back many memories. I was at Harvard, 1900-1904, and saw the Carlisle Indians pull the hidden-ball trick on Harvard. It was at kickoff of the second half. The ball went near the right sidelines, about the Carlisle 5-yard line. Carlisle players grouped around the receiver in a sort of crude flying wedge and started toward the other end of the field. Harvard came rushing downfield. They blocked out one player after another, blocked out all in front of them, and nobody had the ball. And there, midway between the sidelines and about 35 yards from the Harvard goal was a Carlisle Indian with a big hump on his back—the ball under his sweater—and running like a deer. That sure was something to see.
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February 29, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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LEGENDS, MEMORIES AND THE RECORD
Sirs:
Robert Cantwell's article (The Poet, the Bums and the Legendary Red Men, SI, Feb. 15) on Marianne Moore and the Carlisle Indians brought back many memories. I was at Harvard, 1900-1904, and saw the Carlisle Indians pull the hidden-ball trick on Harvard. It was at kickoff of the second half. The ball went near the right sidelines, about the Carlisle 5-yard line. Carlisle players grouped around the receiver in a sort of crude flying wedge and started toward the other end of the field. Harvard came rushing downfield. They blocked out one player after another, blocked out all in front of them, and nobody had the ball. And there, midway between the sidelines and about 35 yards from the Harvard goal was a Carlisle Indian with a big hump on his back—the ball under his sweater—and running like a deer. That sure was something to see.

Carlisle had not then reached the heights it attained later with Jim Thorpe. They did not beat Harvard the years I saw them play, but they played a good hard game and drew large crowds. Football then was quite different from now. Five yards to be gained on three downs, no forward passing, and if a player was taken out he stayed out, as in baseball today. Carlisle had few reserves, and they left their men in the game as long as they could wobble. I remember one big fullback who was decidedly All-America in ability. He would invariably gain some ground, but would get so weary that they had to take time out to revive him for the next play. And finally when he was completely exhausted they would take him out. And while this giant was playing in the backfield, they had some little Esquimaux that looked to be about 5 feet or 5 feet 2 in the line. Maybe they really were Indians, but we called them Esquimaux.
EDWARD AUTEN JR.
Princeville, Ill.

Sirs:
I read with interest Robert Cantwell's fine article and his account of some of the legendary feats of the amazing Carlisle Indians. One statement is pure legend, however. The records indicate that Carlisle never defeated Yale in football. The schools met five times during the period of 1895-1900...with Yale winning rather decisively each time. In 1900, the last meeting of the two schools, it was Carlisle's (not Custer's) last stand, as Yale's national championship team massacred the Indians 35-0.
GEORGE L. BOZZI
Wallingford, Conn.

?Reader Bozzi is right.—ED.

BRIDGE: N.Y. VS. L.A.
Sirs:
Ivan Erdos' letter (19TH HOLE, Feb. 8) sounds like a defy from Los Angeles to New York City's bridge players.

While Los Angeles has some fine players, including Mr. Erdos, we very definitely do consider New York numero uno and will happily field a team to prove it.

Instead of the six-man team Erdos suggests, however, let's make it three or four teams of four, playing as a team-of-12 or team-of-16 match, New York vs. Los Angeles, on a home-and-home basis. The year 1960 would be perfect for such a test; our top players will be going to Los Angeles to compete in the Summer National Championships of the American Contract Bridge League; theirs will, no doubt, be coming to New York in November to compete in the Winter Nationals.

A match, with suitable provision for public kibitzing, might take place just before each of these Nationals, under the joint auspices of the Greater New York Bridge Association and a combination of the Los Angeles area units of the League.
IRA BRALL, President
Greater New York Bridge Assn.
New York City

?Any takers?—ED.

IN GEORGIA AND NEW YORK
Sirs:
The article by Jeremiah Tax about Maurice Stokes and Jack Twyman, A Brave Man and A Good Friend (SI, Feb. 1), is one of the most moving stories in sports of the year, and I want to thank you and Mr. Tax for doing it. If there were more people of the several races and the several faiths being this helpful to each other, we would be a lot better off in Georgia and in New York.
FRED R. STAIR JR.
Atlanta

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