SI Vault
 
FORM CHART 1960 OLYMPICS
August 15, 1960
The following is a listing of every event in the 1960 Olympics. The likely winners, picked by SPORTS ILLUSTRATED experts, are printed in boldface type; in regular type, with their best performances ever shown in parentheses, are the contenders they have to fear most, Under each sport, the four nations with the strongest over-all representation have been listed separately. Other outstanding performers may be found under OTHER NATIONS. A summary appears at the end.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
August 15, 1960

Form Chart 1960 Olympics

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

TRACK & FIELD (world record)

U.S.A.

U.S.S.R.

GERMANY

AUSTRALIA

OTHER NATIONS

ANALYSIS

100 METERS (10.0)

NORTON (10.1)
BUDD (10.2)
SIME (10.2)

OZOLIN (10.3)
BARTENYEV (10.2)

HARY (10.0)
GERMAR (10.2)

 

RADFORD, Great Britain (10.2)
BERRUTI, Italy (10.2)
JEROME, Canada (10.0)

Sprints: Hary's rolling start, rabbit pickup should get him off in front, but Norton's superior top speed, strength should tell in last 20 meters of the 100, last 80 meters of 200. Up close: Radford, Jerome in 100, Johnson, Radford in 200, U.S. sprint relay team may set new world record.

200 METERS (20.5)

NORTON (20.5)
JOHNSON (20.5)
CARNEY (20.7)

BARTENYEV (21.1)
OZOLIN (21.1)

GERMAR (20.8)
HARY (20.5)

 

RADFORD, Great Britain (20.4)
BERRUTI, Italy (20.7)
SEYE, France (20.7)

400-METER RELAY (39.5)

FIRST

 

SECOND

 

CANADA (3rd)

400 meters: Spence may be the best quarter miler in the world. A master of the delicate sense of pace required by this race, he should beat the U.S's strong Jack Yerman, who is not fast enough, and fast Otis Davis, who cannot pace his race. The 1,600-meter relay—BWI, South Africa, Germany very close to U.S.

400 METERS (45.2)

YERMAN (46.0)
YOUNG (45.9)
O. DAVIS (45.8)

 

KAUFMANN (45. 4)
KINDER (45.8)

 

SPENCE, S. Africa (45.6)
SINGH, India
(46.0)
KERR, BWI (45.8)

1,600-METER RELAY (3:03.9)

FIRST

     

BRITISH WEST INDIES (3rd)
SOUTH AFRICA (2nd)

800 METERS (1:45.7)

MURPHY (1:46.7)
SIEBERT (1:46.8)
CUNLIFEE (1:46.6)

BULISHEV (1:48.8)

SCHMIDT (1:46.2)

BLUE (1:147.1)

KERR, BWI (1:46.4)
MOENS, Belgium (1:45.7)

800 meters: George Kerr is a paramount half miler. He has speed, strength and tactical sense. Murphy and Siebert finish powerfully but they may be too far behind to kick in.

1,500 METERS (3:36.0)

BURLESON (3:41.6)
GRELLE (3:42.7)

 

VALENTIN (3:39.3)

ELLIOTT (3:36)
LINCOLN (3:38.9)
THOMAS (3:41.6)

DELANY, Ireland (3:40.5)
ROZSAVOLGYI, Hungary (3:38.8)
VAMOS, Rumania (3:40.5)

1,500 meters: Elliott's the best, running from in front or kicking from behind. Burleson is too young to stand the pace. Rozsavolgyi of Hungary and Valentin, the strong, fast German, are best fitted to battle Elliott.

5,000 METERS (13:35.0)

BEATTY (13:51.7)

BOLOTNIKOV (13:52.8)
ARTINYUK (13:53.0)
YEFIMOV (14:03.0)

F. JANKE (13:42.4)
GRODOTZKI (13:48.4)

THOMAS (14:04.6)
LAWRENCE (13:54.2)

ZIMNY, Poland (13:44.4)
HALBERG, N. Zealand (13:55.4)
PIRIE, Great Britain (18:36.8)

5,000 meters: Halberg is a complete athlete, from 1,500 meters up. His pace, kick should kill off opponents. America's Beatty might, conceivably, outrun him in the stretch.

10,000 METERS (28:30.4)

 

BOLOTNIKOV (28:58.0)
ARTINYUK (28:58.0)
ZHUKOV (28:58.6)

GRODOTZKI (28:57.8)
HONICKE (29:08.6)

POWER (29:32.0)
LAWRENCE (28:53.6)

HALBERG, N. Zealand (28:48.0)
ZIMNY, Poland (29:28.6)
KOVACS, Hungary (28:52.4)

10,000 meters: Halberg may double in this race and the 5,000, win both, as Kuts did at Melbourne. Lawrence of Australia is strong, used to heat, a factor in Rome.

STEEPLECHASE (8:31.4)

COLEMAN (8:40.8)

YEVDOKIMOV (8:38.0)
SOKOLOV (8:32.4)
RZHISHCHIN (8:35.6)

BUHL (8:34.0)

 

KRZYSKOWIAK, Poland (8:31.4)
ZHANAL, Czechoslovakia (8:43.4)
SIMON, Hungary (8:40.6)

Steeplechase: Toughest of all races, murderously exhausting. Krzyskowiak sets tremendous pace, can hold it. Russians are close, U.S. entry unable to run so fast so far.

110-METER HURDLES (13.2)

CALHOUN (13.4)
MAY (13.5)
JONES (13.5)

MIKHAILOV (13.6)

LAUER (13.2)

 

YANG, Nat. China (13.9)
LORGER, Yugoslavia (13.9)

Hurdles: Germany's Lauer has best time, but probably cannot match Calhoun technique, May and Jones speed. Lauer, like Hary, needs a break from starter, may not get it. At 400 meters Potgieter combines form and speed, but not as well as Davis. Howard is strong, Cushman faster.

400-METER HURDLES (49.2)

G. DAVIS (49.2)
HOWARD (49.8)
CUSHMAN (49.9)

MATSULEVICH (51.4)
SYEDOV (51.4)
KLYENIN (51.2)

JANZ (50.6)

 

POTGIETER, S. Africa (49.0)
MORALE, Italy (50.9)
FARRELL, Great Britain (51.0)

HIGH JUMP (7 feet 3� inches)

THOMAS (7-3�)
FAUST (7-0)
DUMAS (7-0�)

BOLSHOV (7-0�)
KASHKAROV (7-0�)
SHAVLAKADZE (6-11 7/8)

 

PORTER (6-10?)

PETTERSSON, Sweden (6-11?)
SALMINEN, Finland (6-10?)

High jump: Only question is second place. Thomas is incomparably the best, but Russians may break into top three if Dumas is not at peak or Faust not inspired.

BROAD JUMP (26 feet 8� inches)

BOSTON (26-6�)
WATSON (25-9�)
ROBERSON (26-2)

TER-OVANESYAN (26-3�)

STEINBACH (26-0�)
MOLZBERGER (25-0�)

 

VISSER, Netherlands (26-2)

Broad jump: Boston is a good bet to break oldest of all world records. Watson, young and eager, should whip Ter-Ovanesyan, best of Russian entries, and Roberson might.

POLE VAULT (15 feet 9� inches)

BRAGG (15-9�)
MORRIS (15-5�)
CLARK (15-3)

KRASOVSKIS (15-1�)
PETRENKO (14 9�)
BULATOV (15-2�)

PREUSSGER (15-1?)

   

Pole vault: Take Tarzan of the Apes—Don Bragg. He's the biggest and best, and Ron Morris, much smaller, is next best. Russia could be third, with U.S.'s Dave Clark, fourth.

HOP, STEP & JUMP (55 feet 10� inches)

I. DAVIS (53-4�)
SHARPE (5-1�)

GORYAYEV (54-2)
FEDOSEYEV (54-9�)
KREER (54-0)

 

TOMLINSON (52-6)

DA SILVA, Brazil (54-4)
SCHMIDT, Poland (55-10�)

Goryayev has improved rapidly. So has Schmidt, his most dangerous rival, who broke the world record on Aug. 5. Ira a Davis may win a point or two and so will 32 year old Da Silva if he can reach Melbourne peak.

SHOTPUT (65 feet 7 inches)

LONG (64-6�)
O'BRIEN (63-5)
D. DAVIS (62-8�)

LIPSNIS (60-8)
VARANAUSKAS (59-5�)

   

ROWE, Great Britain (62-1)
VARJU, Hungary (61-2�)
MECONI, Italy (60-7�)

Shotput: U.S. with Dallas Long, Parry O'Brien, Dave Davis I should sweep first three places. Europeans have not improved enough.

DISCUS (196 feet 6� inches)

OERTER (194-1�)
BABKA (192-3�)
COCHRAN (188-10)

TRUSENYEV (185-8�)
BUKHANTSEV (184-4�)
KOMPANAYETS (185-5)

   

PIATKOWSKI, Poland (196-6�)
SZECSENYI, Hungary (193-8)
KOCH, Netherlands (184-9�)

Discus: Oerter or Babka could set world record, will very 1 likely place one-two ahead of Poland's Piatkowski.

HAMMER THROW (225 feet 4 inches)

CONNOLLY (225-4)
HALL (220-7)
BAGDONAS (205-11)

RUDENKOV (222-10)
BAKARINOV (213-10�)
NIKULIN (216-3)

PETER (206-7)

 

ZSIVOTZKY, Hungary (223-9�)
CSERMAK, Hungary (210-8�)
LAWLOR, Ireland (209-6�)

Hammer throw: Connolly has been consistent winner but 1 he may be surprised by Al Hall. Russians look good for third, fourth.

JAVELIN (283 feet 8 inches)

ALLEY (283-8)
CANTELLO (282-3�)
BEUCHER (255-11)

VLAD.KUZNETSOV (278-6�)
TSIBULENKO (273-5)
OVCHINNICK (255-3�)

KRUGER (261-2)
AHREND (258-6�)

 

SIDLO, Poland (280-8�)
FREDRIKSSON, Sweden (272-2)
C. LIEVORE, Italy (266-2�)

Javelin: Alley's and Cantello's long throws were made with non-Olympic javelins. Sidlo's 280 plus was regulation.

DECATHLON (8,683)

JOHNSON (8,683)
EDSTROM (8,176)

KUZNETSOV (8,357)
KUTENKO (7,989)

LAUER (7,955)

 

YANG, Nat. China (8,426)

Decathlon: One name suffices Rafer Johnson. The new world record holder is in a class by himself, and the competition should be between Kuznetsov, Yang and Edstrom—for second.

MARATHON (no record)

KELLEY

POPOV

 

OLLERENSHAW

OKSENEN, Finland
HIROSHIMA, Japan

Marathon: U.S. finally admitted best competitor, John Kelley, but against the distance-loving foreigners he has little chance for first place This event is wide open, should be won by Russia or Great Britain.

20-KM. WALK (1:25:57.2)

 

VEDYAKOV (1:25:57.2)
GOLUBNICHI (1:27:05)
LAVROV (1:28:43.6)

   

MATTHEWS, Great Britain (1:26:05.2)
VICKERS, Great Britain (1:28:43.6)

 

50-KM WALK (41:11:18.6)

 

VEDYAKOV (4:03:00.0)
LOBASTOV (4:16:08.6)

   

READ, New Zealand (4:21:23.0)

The walks: This odd, Mae West-wiggly event is interesting to Europeans, couldn't mean less to Americans. So the Russians will, as usual, blanket the finish, with the U.S. entry far behind, tired and happy for the free trip to Rome.

Women:
100 METERS (11.3)

RUDOLPH (11.5)
JONES (11.6)

ITKINA (11.4)
KREPKINA (11.5)

RAEPKE (11.7)
HENDRIX (11.6)

CUTHBERT (11.4)
DUGGAN (11.5)

FREDRICKSON, S. Africa (11.5)
HYMAN, Great Britain (11.8)

Women: Led by Betty Cuthbert, triple gold medalist, the Australian sprinters won all of the foot races at Melbourne in 1956. Other women have run faster times this season, but Cuthbert, who has met and defeated Russia's Itkina, JS more consistent than the U.S.'s talented Wilma Rudolph. In the relay, the U.S.'s Tennessee State girls, who pass the baton smoothly, should push the Aussies to a world record with the Germans close behind.

200 METERS (22.9)

RUDOLPH (22.9)
WILLIAMS (23.4)

ITKINA (23.6)
MASLOVSKAYA (24.0)

BIRKEMEYER (23.4)
HEINE (23.7)

CUTHBERT (23.1)
DUGGAN (23.3)

LEONE, Italy (24.0)

400-METER RELAY (44.5)

SECOND

THIRD

 

FIRST

Great Britain

800 METERS (2:04.3)

 

LYSENKO (2:04:3)
KOTOVA (2:06.6)

DONATH (2:06.3)
KUMMERFELD (2:06.7)

JONES (2:08.8)

GRESECU, Rumania (2:08.6)
JORDAN, Great Britain (2:07.4)

Only the Germans have a chance to upset the well-conditioned and experienced Russian women in the 800-meter, which is being run for the first time since 1928.

80-METER HURDLES (10.5)

 

KOSHOLEVA (10.6)
I. PRESS (10.6)

BIRKEMEYER (10.5)
KOPP (10.7)

THROWER (10.6)
WIGNEY (10.8)

STAMEJCIC, Yugoslavia (10.9)

Australia's hurdler. Norma Thrower, has a chance to finish next to Germany's Birkemeyer. but will have to beat two fast-stepping Russians to win a silver medal.

HIGH JUMP (6 feet 1� inches)

 

CHENCHIK (5-10)
DOLYA (5-9�)

 

FRITH (5-8�)

BALAS, Rumania (6-1�)

Rumania's high jumper. Jolanda Balas is as far ahead of her rivals as John Thomas is ahead of his. Claus broke the broad jump world record on August 7th but Krzesinska is steadier. Russian women should win gold or silver medals in all other events, particularly in the field where opposition is only spotty.

BROAD JUMP (21 feet 0 inches)

WHITE (20-4�)

SHAPRUNOVA (20-8�)
RADCHENKO (20-4�)

CLAUS (21-0)
H. HOFFMANN (20-0�)

MITCHELL (20-4�)

KRZESINSKA, Poland (20-10)
BIGNAL, Great Britain (20-7)

SHOTPUT (57 feet 1� inches)

BROWN (54-3)

T. PRESS (57-1�)
DOYNIKOVA (54-9)

LUTTGE (53-8�)
W. HOFFMANN (53-6�)

 

SLOPER, N. Zealand (54-7)

DISCUS (187 feet 1� inches)

BROWN (176-10)
CONNOLLY (172-4�)

T. PRESS (184-9)
PONOMARYEVA (184-4)

SCHUCH (180-5�)
MUELLER (181-6�)

 

NEMKOVA, Czechoslovakia (177-10�)
MERTOVA, Czechoslovakia (177-8�)

JAVELIN (195 feet 2� inches)

OLDHAM (163-5�)

OZOLINA (195-2�)
KALDENE (181-8)

 

PAZERA (188-4)

PESCOVA, Czechoslovakia (184-5)
ZATOPKOVA, Czechoslovakia (183-1�)

SWIMMING (world record)

AUSTRALIA

U.S.A.

JAPAN

GERMANY

OTHER NATIONS

100-METER FREESTYLE (54.6)

DEVITT (54.6)
HENRICKS (55.3)

LARSON (55.0)
HUNTER (56.0)

YAMANAKA (56.4)
ISHIHARA (56.7)

WIEGAND (56.2)

DOBAY, Hungary (56.1)
DOS SANTOS, Brazil (55.6)

Freestyle: The U.S. was set to regain a gold medal in the 100 until untimely appendectomy eliminated Jeff Farrell. But Larson poses a definite challenge to Henricks and Devitt, who-: were one-two in 1956. Distances go to Konrads and his world J record rival, Yarnanaka, although U.S.'s Somers is coming ' fast in the 400.

400-METER FREESTYLE (4:15.9)

KONRADS (4:15.9)
ROSE (4:21.3)

SOMERS (4:21.9)
LENZ (4:25.2)

YAMANAKA (4:16.6)
FUKUI (4:25.7)

WIEGAND (4:28.0)
KLEIN (4:29.7)

NIKITIN U.S.S.R. (4:30.1)
BLACK, Great Britain (4:25.8)

1,500-METER FREESTYLE (17:11.0)

KONRADS (17:11.0)
ROSE (17:40.2)

BREEN (17:33.5)
SOMERS (17:35.4)

YAMANAKA (17:25.0)
NAKABU (18:17.0)

HETZ (18.00.5)
BACHMANN (18:18.2)

KATONA, Hungary (17:55.2)
BLACK, Great Britain (18:05.8)

200-METER BREASTSTROKE (2:36.5)

GATHERCOLE (2:36.5)
BURTON (2:41.2)

HAIT (2:40.2)
MULLIKEN (2:40.9)

OSAKI (2:36.9)
MASUDA (2:39.3)

HENNINGER (2:37.4)
ENKE (2:38.6)

PROKOLENKO, U.S.S.R. (2:38.0)
MENSONIDES, Netherlands (2:41.7)

Other strokes: In the breaststroke six men could finish within the space of a fingernail. A European is the likeliest winner since August is normally an off season for the Aussies. Mike Troy and Bob Bennett, relative newcomers, are young and 1 tough enough to win the butterfly and backstrokes for the U.S., , but Bennett must outstroke a strong, smart field of veterans.

200-METER BUTTERFLY (2:13.2)

HAYES (2:17.5)

TROY (2:13.2)
GILLANDERS (2:14.0)

YOSHIMURA (2:17.8)
IZUTU (2:18.9)

 

BLACK, Great Britain (2:17.8)
DENNERLEIN, Italy (2:18.0)

100-METER BACKSTROKE (1:01.5)

THIELE (1:02.6)
MONCKTON (1:01.5)

BENNETT (1:01.9)
McKINNEY (1:02.6)

 

WAGNER (1:03.2)
DIETZ (1:03.3)

CRISTOPHE, France (1:02.2)
SIMAR, U.S.S.R. (1:03.3)

800-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

SECOND

FIRST

THIRD

 

HUNGARY

Relays: U.S. is headed for a world record in the medley, also rates a slight edge in the freestyle. Australia's winter training has not brought hoped-for progress.

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

SECOND

FIRST

   

RUSSIA (3rd)

THREE-METER DIVING

 

HALL
TOBIAN

 

POPHAL

COLLIN, Great Britain

Diving: No diving coaches in the world match the Americans, i Mexico's Al Gaxiola, who attended the U. of Michigan, wort the 1959 Pan Ams, but Webster and Tobian are ready now. No one in the world threatens Sam Hall on the springboard. **

10-METER PLATFORM DIVE

 

WEBSTER
TOBIAN

 

SPERLING

GAXIOLA, Mexico
PHELPS, Great Britain

Women:

AUSTRALIA

U.S.A.

GERMANY

NETHERLANDS

OTHER NATIONS

100-METER FREESTYLE (60.2)

FRASER (60.2)
KONRADS (62.6)

VON SALTZA (61.3)
WOOD (62.6)

BRUNNER (64.4)

GASTELAARS (62.9)
POSTHUMUS (63.9)

MADARASZ, Hungary (62.5)
STEWARD, Great Britain (64.3)

Freestyle: American women have had best coaching in world 1 during last year and Chris von Saltza, who continues to I improve, is steadily overtaking Fraser and Konrads, who have leveled off. She lacks Fraser's flexibility in 100 but has * power to become first American woman to win 400 since 1948.

400-METER FREESTYLE (4:44.5)

KONRADS (4:45.4)
FRASER (4:45.6)

VON SALTZA (4:44.5)
HOUSE (4:55.1)

WEISS (5:01.5)
BRUNNER (5:04.3)

SCHIMMEL (4:52.4)
DE NIJS (5:00.5)

SEGERSTROM, Sweden (4:57.6)
RAE, Great Britain (5:01.2)

200-METER BREASTROKE (2:50.2)

LASSIG (2:56.6)

WARNER (2:51.4)
KEMPNER (2:56.6)

URSELMANN (2:50.2)
GOBEL (2:50.3)

DEN HAAN (2:51.3)

LONSBROUGH, Great Britain (2:50.3)
KILLERMAN, Hungary 2:53.0)

Other strokes: As with the men, the breaststroke crown | goes to Europe, although Warner is improving faster than j her rivals. Burke is a combination of power, smoothness and control, is likely to cut a full second from her new j world record. Burke and Wood can score two most decisive l wins in Olympics.

100-METER BUTTERFLY (1:09.1)

FRASER (1:10.8)
ANDREW (1:11.3)

WOOD (1:09.4)
SCHULER (1:09.6)

FUHRMANN (1:11.4.)

LAGERBERG (1:10.7)
VOORBIJ (1:10.5)

WATT, Great Britain (1:12.3)
KR. LARSSON, Sweden (1:12.4)

100-METER BACKSTROKE (1:09.2)

BECKETT (1:13.1)
WILSON (1:13.9)

BURKE (1:09.2)
HARMAR (1:11.8)

I.SCHMIDT (1:11.1)
H. SCHMIDT (1:12.8)

VAN VELSEN (1:10:9)
DOBBER (1:11.8)

STEWARD, Great Britain (1:11.2)
VIKTROVA, U.S.S.R. (1:11.7)

400-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

FIRST

SECOND

   

GREAT BRITAIN

Relays: A solid margin in butterfly and backstroke, plus nearly equal talent in breaststroke and freestyle, make U.S. a strong favorite in medley. But no one has Australia's freestyle depth.

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

SECOND

FIRST

 

THIRD

CANADA

THREE-METER DIVE

KNIGHT

POPE
WILLARD

KRAMER

LUGTHART

MacDONALD, Canada

Diving: Unfortunately for the U.S., only two entries are allowed per event. The platform is America's, while only outside threat at three meters is Los Angeles-trained Irene MacDonald of Canada.

10-METER PLATFORM DIVE

KNIGHT

POPE
IRWIN

   

AUSTIN, Great Britain

BASKETBALL

U.S.A.

U.S.S.R.

BRAZIL

PUERTO RICO

FRANCE

Basketball: The U.S. squad led by Robertson and West is the finest amateur basketball team ever assembled—anywhere—any time in the world. Against smaller teams the margin of victory should be positively embarrassing. The Russians are as tall and getting faster on their feet and are determined to win, but they will be lucky to come within 30 points of the U.S. Brazil has slight edge over a surprisingly tall, but still green, Puerto Rican team.

BOXING

U.S.S.R.

POLAND

GERMANY

RUMANIA

OTHER NATIONS

Boxing: Russia and Poland have the more experienced boxers, but Germany is coming up fast and Rumania's team is loaded with scrappy young men. Competition should be closest in the light heavyweight division. Teen-age Cassius Clay, who has been called another Patterson, wa.s the only American to score a knockout in the Olympic trials. The chances are he will have more trouble against the Europeans, some of whom have had as many as 200 fights.

FLYWEIGHT

STOLNIKOV

KUKIER

HOMBERG

DOBRESCU

McCLEAN, Ireland

BANTAM

GRIGORIEV

ZAWADSKI

RASCHER

PUIU

MITROVAK, Yugoslavia

FEATHER

SAFRONOV

ADAMSKI

KIRSCH

GHEORGHIU

LIMMONEN, Finland

LIGHT

KOKOSHKIN

PAZDIOR

LEMPIO

MIHAILIK

MAKI, Finland

LIGHT WELTER

JENGEBARIAN

KASPRZYK

BUSSE

MARIN

SALUDON, France

WELTER

RADONYAK

DROGOSZ

GUSE

STOIAN

JOSSELIN, France

LIGHT MIDDLE

SOBOLOV

DAMPC

CAROLI

NEASCU

BENVENUTI, Italy

MIDDLE

SHATKOV

WALASEK

RADZIK

MONEA

JAKOVLJEVIC, Yugoslavia

LIGHT HEAVY

LYASOTA

PIETRZKOWSKI

WILLER

NEGREA

CLAY, U.S.A.

HEAVY

ABRAMOV

JEDRZEJESSKI

SIEGMUND

MARIUTAN

THOMAS, Great Britain

CANOEING

HUNGARY

GERMANY

RUMANIA

U.S.S.R.

OTHER NATIONS

Canoeing: Hungary's traditional strength in kayaks and canoes assures every member of a medal. Rumania is a water-minded nation, and it will win in the canoe events. The physically powerful Russian women should easily sweep the kayak events. Russia.';, men have not improved, but His Germans have arid : should pass them.

K-l

SZOLLOSI

LANGE

 

SILAEV

KAPLANIAK, Poland

K-2

SECOND

FIRST

   

POLAND

C-l

PARTI

LEWE

ROTMAN

BELAEV

POLAKOVIC, Czechoslovakia

C-2

SECOND

 

FIRST

THIRD

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

K-l RELAY

SECOND

FIRST

   

AUSTRALIA (3rd)

K-1 (women)

BANFALVI

ZENZ

 

KISLOVA

WALKOWIAKOWNA, Poland

K-2 (women)

THIRD

SECOND

 

FIRST

Poland

CYCLING

GERMANY

ITALY

AUSTRALIA

NETHERLANDS

OTHER NATIONS

Cycling: French and Italian cyclists are the best in the world, but this year, alas, the best of the French have already turned pro, leaving the field to the Roman hosts. Belgians and Germans will probably be obstreperous guests, and Aussies have been known to be brash.

1,000-M. SPRINT, IND.

KASLOWSKI

GAIARDONI

BAENSCH

 

STERCK, Belgium

1,000-M. IND. T.T.

GIESELER

VALLOTTO

CHAPMAN

 

CLAUD, France

2,000-M. TANDEM

 

THIRD

SECOND

FIRST

TEAM PURSUIT

FIRST

 

SECOND

THIRD

FRANCE

ROAD, IND.

SCHUR

TRAPE

   

VAN DEN BERGHEN, Belgium

ROAD, TEAM

FIRST

SECOND

   

BELGIUM (3rd)

EQUESTRIAN

GERMANY

ITALY

U.S.A.

GREAT BRITAIN

OTHER NATIONS

Equestrian: Germany. Sweden, Italy and England dominated the Stockholm Olympics and should again. However, the U.S., which placed high in recent European competitions, has its strongest jumping team. The Russians, never before a menace, are now to be reckoned with in both show jumping and the Grand Prix dressage. In the latter event, however, Trish Galvin should become the first US. dressage medal winner since 1932. TVie Canadians (gold medal winners in me Pan American Games) and the Australians could be the outsiders to break the Swedish, British and German domination in the three-day event, and the US.'s Michael Page on The Grasshopper is a strong contender. But, as any $2 bettor knows, horses-even Olympic horses—are unreliable at best

THREE-DAY TEAM

FIRST

   

THIRD

CANADA (2nd), SWEDEN

THREE-DAY IND.

KLIMKE

 

PAGE

WELDON

ROYCROFT, Australia

PRIZE OF NATIONS

SECOND

FIRST

THIRD

 

U.S.S.R.

GRAND PRIX IND.

WINKLER

P.D'INZEO

STEINKRAUS

BROOME

 

THEIDEMANN

R.D'INZEO

MORRIS

SMYTHE

 

SCHRIDDE

OPES

WILEY

WOFFARD

DRESSAGE

SPRINGER

 

GALVIN

 

FILATOV, U.S.S.R., ST. CYR, Sweden

FENCING

HUNGARY

U.S.S.R.

ITALY

FRANCE

OTHER NATIONS

Fencing: The graceful style of men's e"p6e and foil fencing as exhibited by traditional fencing powers, Italy and France, has been gradually giving way to the more powerfully aggressive tactics of the Russians and Poles. While Hungary's depth of sabre talent should assure it the team gold medal, individual stars Karpati and Gerevich will find Poland's Pawlowski a formidable foe. Among the women, Sheen, the defending champion, will have a harder time with talented newcomer Ragno.

FOIL

KAMUTI

MIDDLER

BERGAMINI

D'ORIOLA

GLOS, Poland

FOIL TEAM

THIRD

SECOND

 

FIRST

GERMANY

EPEE

SAKOVICS

KHABAROV

PELLEGRINO

MOUYAL

HOSKYNS, Great Britain

EPEE TEAM

SECOND

THIRD

FIRST

 

GREAT BRITAIN

SABRE

KARPATI

TISHLER

CALARESE

D'ORIOLA

PAWLOWSKI, Poland

SABRE TEAM

FIRST

SECOND

   

POLAND (3rd)

FOIL (women)

DOMOLKI

ZABELINA

RAG NO

DELBARRE

SHEEN, Great Britain

FOIL TEAM

THIRD

FIRST

SECOND

 

GERMANY

GYMNASTICS

U.S.S.R.

JAPAN

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

GERMANY

OTHER NATIONS

Gymnastics: Here's where Russia can pile up 12 gold medals and offset the U.S.'s margin i/i track and field. Among the men, only Japan has the experience and talent to stop the Russians. Hundredths of a point separate Japan's Melbourne veterans Takemoto and Ono from the Russian trio of Azarian, Shakhlin and Titov. Russian women will have it harder against the eastern Europeans, who have learned well the point-gaining ballet movements.

TEAM (men)

FIRST

SECOND

 

THIRD

SWITZERLAND

INDIVIDUAL

SHAKHLIN

   

FUERST

FIVIAN, Switzerland

FREE STANDING

KERDEMELIDI

ONO

STASTNY

LYHS

CERAR, Yugoslavia

HORIZONTAL BAR

TITOV

TAKEMOTO

 

FRIEDRICH

KESTOLA, Finland

PARALLEL BARS

MILIGULO

ONO

 

FUERST

BENKERT, Switzerland

POMMEL HORSE

SHAKHLIN

ONO

 

FUERST

LEIMAVERTA, Finland

LONG HORSE VAULT

TITOV

TAKEMOTO

 

BANTZ

FIVIAN, Switzerland

RINGS

SHAKHLIN

MITSUKURI

 

KOPPE

KAPSAZOW, Bulgaria

TEAM (women)

FIRST

 

SECOND

THIRD

POLAND

INDIVIDUAL

ASTAKHOVA

IKEDA

 

FOST

LEUSTAN, Rumania

FREE STANDING

ASTAKHOVA

 

BOSAKOVA

 

STACHOW, Poland

BALANCE BEAM

MURATOVA

 

CASLOVSKA

SONNTAG

KOTOWNA, Poland

UNEVEN BARS

ASTAKHOVA

 

TAKOVA

 

IOVAN, Rumania

LONG-HORSE VAULT

LATYNINA

 

CASLOVSKA

SCHEINER

STACHOV, Poland

FIELD HOCKEY

INDIA

PAKISTAN

GERMANY

GREAT BRITAIN

NETHERLANDS

Field hockey: Evenly matched India and Pakistan play the classical game of tight paiss patterns, which they execute with bewildering speed and accuracy. With just a little luck Pakistan could break India's stranglehold on the sport. Germany plays a long-driving game combined; with a rough defense that has broken more than one opposing player's leg, but if Great Britain's first string can stay on its feet it may take the bronze medal.

MODERN PENTATHLON

U.S.S.R.

HUNGARY

U.S.A.

SWEDEN

OTHER NATIONS

Modern pentathlon: Traditionally, the Swedes win the mod-ern pentathlon, but although their two-time Olympic gold medal winner, Lars Hall, has come back to try for a third, the Russians and Hungarians now are the ones to watch. Three-time World Champion Igor Novikov, a Russian schoolteacher, is one reason. And he is being pushed closely at home by young Estonian Hanno Selg, a crack shot and fast runner. Hungary's Ferenc Nemeth was the new sensation at this year's spring pentathlon in Rome, and his teammate, Andreas Balczo, was a close second to Novikov in the 1959 world championships. The spunky Finns are always tough competitors, and the U.S., although it probably won't win any of the individual events (except possibly riding) has a well-balanced team which should rate high.

TEAM

FIRST

SECOND

THIRD

 

FINLAND

INDIVIDUAL

NOVIKOV

NEMETH

LAMBERT

HALL

KATTER, Finland

 

SELG

BALCZO

DANIELS

ERICKSSON

KORHONEN, Finland

 

TATARINOV

NAGY

BECK

SEVEGARD

KARE, Finland

ROWING

GERMANY

ITALY

U.S.S..R.

U.S.A.

OTHER NATIONS

Rowing: For the first time in 40 years the U.S. may lose its gold medal in eight oars. Navy will have to pull hard to beat the German crew that has broken all European records by using shorter, spoonlike oars and "interval" training. Fast Australian and Italian crews are also tough. In smaller boats, the U.S. is strong, but German and European teams are stronger. Stuart MacKenzie, the world's best sculler, and U.S. doubles entry of Jack Kelly and Bill Knecht must beat superb Russian rowers.

SINGLE SCULLS

VON FERSEN

 

IVANOV

PARKER

MacKENZIE, Australia

PAIRS

FIRST

SECOND

THIRD

 

AUSTRIA

COXED PAIRS

FIRST

THIRD

SECOND

 

GREAT BRITAIN

DOUBLE SCULLS

   

FIRST

SECOND

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (3rd)

COXED FOURS

FIRST

 

SECOND

 

YUGOSLAVIA (3rd)

FOURS

FIRST

SECOND

   

HUNGARY (3rd)

EIGHTS

FIRST

THIRD

 

SECOND

AUSTRALIA

SHOOTING

U.S.S.R.

RUMANIA

FINLAND

U.S.A.

OTHER NATIONS

Shooting: Russia's sharpshooters. Bogdanovand Borisov,who have dominated international events for four years, should easily wrap up most titles for U.S.S.R., but U.S.'s Daniel Puckel has a remarkable eye and should be individual star. The U.S. has its strongest team since 1948. Finland and Rumania are close behind.

CLAY PIGEON FREE PISTOL

MOGUILEUSKI

BUMITRESCU

 

RIEGGER

ROSSINI, Italy

FREE RIFLE

UMAROV

MAGYAR

LINNOSVUO

LINCOLN

ULLMAN, Sweden

SILHOUETTE

BORISOV

ROTARU

YLONEN

PUCKEL

ZAHRINGER, Germany

SMALL BORE

CERKASOV

PETRESCU

LINNOSVUO

McMILLAN

HRNECEK, Czechoslovakia

3 POSITION SMALL BORE

BOGDANOV

SIRBU

YLONEN

PUCKEL

SUNDBERG, Sweden

PRONE

ITKES

SIRBU

NORDQUIST

TREW

OUELLETTE, Canada

SOCCER

YUGOSLAVIA

BULGARIA

HUNGARY

DENMARK

PERU

Soccer: Russia's first-string soccer players were declared ineligible for amateur play. Her substitutes failed to qualify among the 16 Rome f nalists, and that leaves the gold meda' pretty much to Yugoslavia, which has finished second to Rus sia in the last three Olympics. Surprising Denmark, however, might be a spoiler.

WATER POLO

HUNGARY

U.S.S.R.

YUGOSLAVIA

RUMANIA

U.S.A.

Water polo: There is really very little difference between the big four, all exponents of the open style of play with its emphasis on offense. Hungary has depth of talent. Yugoslavia has played together the longest, Russia has tremendous swimming stamina and the Rumanians spirit. The U.S. continues to improve and might finish third if it has luck in the draw for the preliminary rounds.

WEIGHT LIFTING

U.S.S.R.

U.S.A.

POLAND

FINLAND

OTHER NATIONS

Weight lifting: Until two years ago a handful of hard-working American boys, who had won four of the seven gold medals at Melbourne, maintained an edge over the Russians. Only Kono appears a solid choice today. Vinci is steady and Berger has a good chance, but the lack of interest in the U.S. has taken its toll.

BANTAM

ULYANOV

VINCI

JANKOWSKI

 

MIYAKE, Japan

FEATHER

CHIMISHKYAN

BERGER

KOSLOWSKI

 

MANNIRONI, Italy

LIGHT

BUSHUEV

 

ZIELINSKI

 

ONUMA, Japan

MIDDLE

KURYNOV

KONO

BOCHENEK

KAILAJARVI

VERES, Hungary

LIGHT HEAVY

PLUKFELDER

GEORGE

PALINISKI

 

BAROGA, Rumania

HEAVY LIGHT

LOMAKIN

PULSKAMP

   

MARTIN, Great Britain

HEAVY

VLASOV

BRADFORD

 

MAKINEN

SELVETTI, Argentina

WRESTLING

U.S.S.R.

TURKEY

IRAN

JAPAN

OTHER NATIONS

Wrestling: U.S. colleges don't use the international style, where the instantaneous touch rule applies, making this Olympic team weaker than it should be. In the freestyle events the Russians are physically very strong, the Japanese agile in squirming out of pin positions and the Turks and Iranians fast and merciless in their attack. The emphasis is on pure strength in Greco-Roman style, which also has instantaneous touch rule but prohibits use of legs and hold's below the belt. With nimbleness and versatility secondary, Japan and Iran fade as threats. Tough, strong and experienced, Russians, Swedes, Finns and Turks know the value of intensive weight-lifting discipline, will dominate matches.

Freestyle:

ALIEV

KARTAL

SEYFPOUR

MATSUBARA

FLYWEIGHT

 

AKBAS

 

ASAI

JASKARI, Finland

BANTAM

SINYAVSKI

DAGISTANLI

 

SATO

FEATHER

 

SAHIN

 

ABE

TOTH, Hungary

LIGHT

 

OGAN

HABIBI

KANEKO

CARLSSON, Sweden

WELTER

TSHKIRTLADZE

GUNGOR

SORURI

NAGAI

GARJEV, Bulgaria

MIDDLE

KULAYEV

ATLI

TAKHTI

 

PALM, Sweden

LIGHT HEAVY

ALBUL

KAPLAN

   

ANTONSSON Sweden

HEAVY

Greco-Roman:

U.S.S R.

TURKEY

SWEDEN

FINLAND

OTHER NATIONS

FLYWEIGHT

 

BILEK

FRENNFORS

 

FABRA, Italy

BANTAM

GUREVICH

VILMAZ

VESTERBY

FEATHER

 

SILLE

L. FREIJ

MAKINEN

POLYAK, Hungary

LIGHT

 

KAMBUR

G. FREIJ

LEHTONEN

DUMITRU. Rumania

WELTER

KARAVAEV

BAYRAK

NYSTROM

 

HORVAT, Yugoslavia

MIDDLE

KARTOSA

DOGAN

ISRAELSSON

 

DOBREV, Bulgaria

LIGHT HEAVY

VYRUPAEV

SELEKMAN

JANSSON

LAHTI

GURICS, Hungary

HEAVY

PARFENOV

TAN TARI

SVENSSON

 

DIETRICH, Germany

YACHTING

DENMARK

ITALY

SWEDEN

U.S.A.

OTHER NATIONS

This is the finest U.S. Olympic yachting team, but American sailors are stiJI not up to the Scandinavians and Europeans, who have two advantages: beautifully designed boats and a steady diet of competition. Peter Barrett in a Finn, and George O'Day in Ray Hunt's 5.5-meter "Minotaur" are best U.S. bets with traditionally strong Stars weaker than in past. After 22 years of sailing, Bill Parks still hasn't beaten Bahama's Dur-ward Knowles or Italy's Agostino Straulino.

5.5-METER

BERNTSEN

REGGIO

SJOSTEN

O'DAY

LEBRUN, France

DRAGON

BIRCH

COSENTINO

PALMQUIST

WALET

CHRISTENSEN, Norway

STAR

 

STRAULINO

CARLSSON

PARKS

QUINA, Portugal

DUTCHMAN

FOGH

CAPIO

VINGE

SINDLE

VERHAGEN, Holland

FINN

ELVSTROM

PELASCHIAR

ANDERSSON

BARRETT

NELIS, Belgium

The following is a listing of every event in the 1960 Olympics. The likely winners, picked by SPORTS ILLUSTRATED experts, are printed in boldface type; in regular type, with their best performances ever shown in parentheses, are the contenders they have to fear most, Under each sport, the four nations with the strongest over-all representation have been listed separately. Other outstanding performers may be found under OTHER NATIONS. A summary appears at the end.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

1