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The East
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback
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September 19, 1960

The East

Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback

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Things are beginning to look up in Middle-town, Conn. The Cardinals have a lightweight line, but it packs more punch and certainly has more depth than last year's unit. Sophomores have helped to improve the situation, and one of them, hard-charging, 200-pound Jim Dooney, will start at guard, thereby freeing Dom Squatrito to return to fullback, where he is needed badly. Second-year Tackles John Crockett, Don McCarthy and George Kozlowski may also nudge their way into the starting lineup before long, while Seniors Dave Gordon and Bob Hausman, string-bean middleweights at 165 pounds, provide adequate protection at the ends. But it is the backfield which gives Coach Norm Daniels his greatest lift. Tony DeMiro, a swift 5-foot 7-inch 155-pounder who knows what to do when he gets into the open, is back at half. So is Jim Thomas, bigger than DeMiro and almost as fast. The Cardinals lack a notable passer, but Jack Mitchell, last year's fullback, will try out at quarterback.

WILLIAMS
1959 RECORD: WON 2, LOST 6

After three full seasons of marvelous success, the Ephmen last year came upon lean days. The new sophomore crop is in, but the harvest is not good. There are too few players and, with some exceptions, the players are too small. To get more heft and muscle into his linemen. Coach Len Watters has prescribed weight-lifting drills. The barbells have helped Captain Lou Guzzetti, a 6-foot 4-inch, 235-pound tackle, but—as one of the East's better forwards—he probably needed the exercise the least. Guard Choppy Rheinfrank is fast, tough and smart, and Center Paul Hill will develop into a fine linebacker, but the rest of the line is average. Ends Bob Judd and John Randolph have been shuffled to fullback, and John Whitney, a poised, experienced quarterback, will again run the split-T. However, his passing leaves much to be desired. It will be up to shifty Halfbacks Jim Bell and Mike Hopewell, a freshman star in 1958 who returns after a year's sabbatical, to supply the attack.

YALE
1959 RECORD: WON 6, LOST 3

The Elis have a solid, hard-hitting first team returning. Despite this, Coach Jordan Olivar must rest his hopes on a sparkling sophomore crop, the best Yale has had in many years. Of the holdovers, Quarterback Tom Singleton, adept on rollouts from the split-T and a proved passer and punter, is the most talented. There are also Halfbacks Lou Miller and Ken Wolfe, the team's leading pass receiver, and Fullback Bob Blanchard, all of whom have shown they can move the ball. All-Ivy Center Mike Pyle, a bruising linebacker and blocker, is flanked by Guards Ben Balme (who missed last season) and Paul Bursiek, and converted center Hardy Wills. They give Yale a large, dependable middle. But ahead and behind them there are disturbing gaps. The tackles are only adequate, the ends lack experience and there is little depth. It will be up to the sophomores—and there are some good ones, especially Fullback Dave Weinstein, End Dillon Hoey and Tackles Stan Riveles and Dave Mawicke.

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