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The East
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback
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September 19, 1960

The East

Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback

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Penn State's affable Rip Engle, who had the ideal "new look" quarterback in versatile Richie Lucas last season, also agrees. "A mobile quarterback is a necessity today," he says, "especially at Penn State where our entire offense depends upon his ability to pass and run. There will be more and more pressure on the flanks by the use of rollouts and options. We may throw only 15 or 16 passes a game, but our quarterback will call many more pass plays which will develop into runs when he exercises his option."

One of the few men in the East who defies change is Syracuse's Schwartzwalder, the area's most successful coach, who is both a practical realist and a nonconformist.

"The trend is one of deployment and multi-formations on offense," Schwartzwalder admits. "But, on defense, it is almost the reverse. There is a growing national swing toward fewer formations and away from the box and massed nine-man fronts.

"However, we at Syracuse are against the grain and we like to be that way. We use a limited number of offensive formations, do not deploy or resort to multiple defenses. We use a mass offense and try to move the defense with our power.

"We are basically an off-tackle team, so we must move the defensive tackle. We know it is a lot easier to move him with two men. So, we keep our ends in tight and double team to get him out of the way.

"Another thing—these deployment teams have to change their offense somewhat when they get inside the other fellow's 10-yard line. We don't have to change a bit. We are geared to move the ball by mass anywhere on the field.

"When everybody was using the tight T," recalls Schwartzwalder, "we had our own version of the wing T. Now that others are using the wing T, we have gone mostly straight T with an unbalanced line. We want to present something different—something that will force the opposition to make special preparations for us.

"On offense we feel our boys can learn one thing better than they can learn 15. So we have comparatively few formations. On defense, we reverse our thinking. We're just the opposite. We are a multiple-defense team—we don't want the opposition to get a pattern on us."

Schwartzwalder has the players, so whatever he says is likely to go. But Penn State and Pittsburgh are strong, too. The East has come back.

AMHERST
1959 RECORD: WON 4, LOST 3, TIED 1

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