SI Vault
 
The East
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 19, 1960

The East

Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

The Lord Jeffs finally achieved a goal last year. They took the Little Three title away from Williams, and now the trick will be to hang on to it. With no spring practice, Coach Jim Ostendarp provided summer reading for his squad—a 150-page book on wing-T plays. If they have learned their lessons well, last year's reserves and the incoming sophomores should be able to plug the gaps left by 14 graduated lettermen. The first line is adequate from tackle to tackle, where hefty Paul Abodeely and aggressive Ron Hatch, shifted from guard, hold forth. They should give swift Halfback Al Deaett, a deceptive breakaway runner, and 190-pound Fullback Steve van Nort sufficient running room. Quarterback Dave Lawrence, who throws for distance, is being hailed as Amherst's best passer ever. However, he will have to prove himself as a play caller, or promising Sophomore Mark Hallam will take over. The ends, Co-Captain John Cheska and Jim Fletcher, can catch passes, but they give away a little on defense.

ARMY
1959 RECORD: WON 4, LOST 4, TIED 1

Coach Dale Hall started last season in the overbearing shadow of Earl Blaik, who departed assuring the public he had left behind an outstanding team. So he had. But injuries cut down key stars, and there were few reserves. The Cadets could do no better than break even. The stars are gone, but Hall has added an option series to make the offense more fluid, and Army's long gray line will be harder to dent. Crashing Linebacker Al Vanderbush is back, the Cadets are two deep in good tackles, and Ends Bob Fuellhart (the new lonely one) and Frank Gibson won't be turned too often. Halfbacks George Kirschenbauer and Roger Zailskas should lend outside zip to the running attack, with balancing inside bursts by Fullbacks Al Rushatz or Bob Eielson. However, the big riddle is at quarterback, where Tom Blanda, only a fair passer, will try to replace whip-armed Joe Caldwell. Converted Halfback Glen Adams, a good runner, and cocky yearling Dick Eckert will be hot after Blanda's job.

BOSTON COLLEGE
1959 RECORD: WON 5, LOST 4

Disenchanted with big Mike Holovak, BC alumni forced his discharge after last year's disappointing 5-4 season. They hope to do better with Ernie Hefferle, who served his apprenticeship as an assistant at Pitt and with the Washington Redskins. The new Eagle master spent a busy spring with an outstanding crop of sophomores, installing the wing T with some new pro-type pass patterns for Quarterback John Amabile, an accomplished pitcher who passed for eight touchdowns and ranked 15th in the nation in 1959. Amabile will get ground support from Senior Halfback Bob Perreault, out with injuries most of last season, Fullback Frank Robotti and John Janas, a speedy sophomore halfback who figures to make the starting lineup. The first line looks solid enough. Guard Bill Byrne, a bulky 205-pounder, and Center Terry Glynn are able defenders. Ends Lou Kirouac and Joe Sikorski are good, tough pass snatchers. Tackle Larry Eisenhauer, shifted from end, is the team's best.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY
1959 RECORD: WON 4, LOST 5

The Terriers won't do much nipping this year. Graduation took six starting linemen and three-quarters of the backfield, and Coach Steve Sinko will have to find his replacements from last year's sophomores and freshmen. BU also faces the uneasy prospect of opening with Penn State, followed by Syracuse. Senior Tackle Bob Minihane, quick and mobile despite his 230 pounds, is the strong man on the line, and he may get some help from Kayo Kehoe, an agile 300-pound center who was benched by the books in 1959 and is reported to be the squad's fastest interior lineman for a short distance. Offensively, the Terriers are still looking for a quarterback to handle the wing T. It could be Jackie Farland, who threw four touchdown passes in 1959, or Paul Squarcia. Fullback Jim Luker is back for another whirl, but Sinko may turn to four sophs—Tom Daubney, who throws well, at quarter, Halfbacks Hugh O'Flynn and Albie Stonkus and Fullback Charley Meadows—for his starting backfield.

BROWN
1959 RECORD: WON 2, LOST 6, TIED 1

Coach John McLaughry introduced his sidesaddle wing T to the Bruins a year ago, and it was hardly a rousing success—Brown beat only Rhode Island and Harvard and finished seventh in the Ivy League. This year McLaughry has added an unbalanced line, with split ends and a slotback, to open up whatever attack his undermanned Bruins can muster, now that All-Ivy Fullback Paul Choquette, most of the offense in 1959, has departed. Jack Rohrback, a good passer and ball handler, is firmly planted in the quarterback saddle, but little Bob Myles, a skimpy 150-pounder, will have to fight off Sophomores Dennis Redding and Parker Crowell, both bigger and faster, for tailback. Ray Barry, a junior who won his letter at halfback in 1958, is back in school and will get a shot at Choquette's job. The line problems are equally depressing. The only bright spots are Captain Billy Packer, an aggressive 190-pound center, Guard Bob Auchy, and Jon Arata, a 6-foot 5-inch, 230-pound sophomore tackle.

BUCKNELL
1959 RECORD: WON 4, LOST 5

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10