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The East
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback
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September 19, 1960

The East

Things have changed in the once underprivileged East, where muscles have grown bigger and the TV cameras are focused on the running quarterback

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These Bisons won't be a thundering herd, but they will have one of the nation's best small-college passers this fall in Quarterback Paul Terhes, who has led the Middle Atlantic Conference in passing and total offense for the past two years. One of the few authentic triple-threaters around, Terhes completed 56% of his passes in 1959 (97 of 173 for 831 yards) and picked up 197 yards rushing. He is the key man in Coach Bob Odell's multiple T. However, Turk, as Terhes is called, will have to go it with young, inexperienced teammates—especially at the ends. But he can still pitch to hard-running, nimble-fingered Halfbacks Ash Ditka and Mickey Melberger. In an effort to bolster a sagging line, Odell spent a busy spring converting ex-Halfback Pat Malone to end, ex-Center Tom Alexander to guard and Former Tackle Kirk Foulke to center. Tackle Dick Bourdeau suddenly has become ineligible, but the Bisons will get some help from Guard Don Chaump, a hustling, slambang 200-pounder who excels on defense.

BUFFALO
1959 RECORD: WON 8, LOST 1

Ambitious Buffalo has become one of the East's small-college powers in recent years. Only five points kept the offense-minded Bulls from an unbeaten season (Bucknell beat them 26-21) in 1959, and they scored 279. However, graduation cost Coach Dick Offenhamer his first four tackles. In consequence the defense may be a little leaky, and moving the ball could be a problem. Center Charlie Scott and Guards Jack Hartman and Joe Shiffert form a strong middle, while Ends Carley Keats and Bill Salent will cover the flanks adequately. But Bob Miller (a 222-pounder) and Bob Yanchuk (208 pounds), the ranking tackles, will have to mature fast against Army and VMI, the first two foes on a good schedule. Lanky Quarterback Gordon Bukaty, an adept passer who manipulates the split-T with all the finesse and cunning of a croupier, heads up a three-quarters senior backfield and will get running help from Halfbacks Ron Clayback and George Mane and hard-hitting Fullback Tom MacDougall.

COLGATE
1959 RECORD: WON 2, LOST 7

Grateful for all small favors, Coach Alva Kelley is particularly pleased this year that he won't have to play Penn State or Holy Cross. But Syracuse remains on the schedule, and the Red Raiders won't soon forget last year's 71-0 drubbing—or the 268 points scored by merciless opponents. Kelley has present as well as past worries. He lost his starting line from tackle to tackle, including Fran Monelli, a mobile 229-pounder; and the most promising of a bumper sophomore crop—End Duane Parcells, Tackle Tom McManamy, Halfback Dick Jackson, Fullback Art Irwin—may still be a year away. Rugged but slow Tackle Jim Hancock and Junior Guard Stu Benedict are adequate, but the Raiders will be hurting for centers and linebackers. Offensively, they will be limited to ground warfare. Wing-T Quarterback Bob Paske isn't much of a passer, so it will be up to the backs, Captain John Maloney, 6-foot 4-inch, 210-pound Jacque MacKinnon and stumpy Fullback Herm Brauch, a powerful but brittle 211-pounder.

COLUMBIA
1959 RECORD: WON 2, LOST 7

This could be the year Columbia has been waiting for since 1951—its last winning season. With 20 returning lettermen providing seasoned campaigners for every position, even Coach Buff Donelli is cautiously optimistic and mildly hopeful of getting even with Ivy League rivals who have whomped him 18 times in the last three seasons. However, all depends upon Quarterback Tom Vasell, who showed considerable potential but often jittered as a sophomore passer in Donelli's intricate wing T. If Vasell runs the team and passes as well as his coaches think he can, the Lions may roar loud enough to hold off many in the Ivy pack. The line appears solid enough to cement last year's defensive holes. The strong men up front are Junior Tackle Bob Asack, strong, quick and a maneuverable 6 feet 3, 215 pounds (his "baby" brother Lou is a 6-foot, 5�-inch, 230-pound sophomore tackle), three-year Guard Tony Radano, and End Bob Federspiel, who holds the Ivy record for pass receiving.

CONNECTICUT
1959 RECORD: WON 6, LOST 3

The Huskies, still striving for national recognition, are headed for their fifth Yankee Conference title in a row. Despite the toughest schedule ever (Holy Cross and Buffalo have been added), they may do as well outside the conference as in if Coach Bob In-galls' springtime gamble pays off. He has switched an adaptable junior, Dave Bishop, an all-conference center last year, to quarterback in the unbalanced wing T. Bishop's talents as a passer are questionable, but he is a real competitor who will keep enemy defenses guessing while handing off to Halfbacks Bill Minnerly, a swivelly runner, and Tom Kopp, a swift seatback type, and bulldozing Fullback Jim Browning. This trio averaged 4.7 yards per carry last year. Senior End Tom Conroy anchors a hard line, and the only question mark is at center, where Don Mendence, a 195-pound junior, must fill Bishop's shoes. Although the Huskies are thin in returning lettermen (14), last year's unbeaten freshmen will bolster the bench.

CORNELL
1959 RECORD: WON 5, LOST 4

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