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The South
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
Not since the Confederacy has the South had so many generals, and their battle plans will include an aerial barrage to go with the usual tight defense
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September 19, 1960

The South

Not since the Confederacy has the South had so many generals, and their battle plans will include an aerial barrage to go with the usual tight defense

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On the debit side of his football ledger, Coach Frank Camp can write in red ink, "Ends, center, fullback." There are just no reliable corner men. Center Dan White has a bad ankle. And the fullback job may have to be entrusted to Lee Calland, a lightweight sophomore. On the credit side, Camp can first list Ernie Green, who last year gained 510 yards rushing. Green has the size and power to shift to fullback, and if his switch with Calland works well the Cardinals should have a perky offense. Directing it will be Quarterback John Giles, a clever runner and improving passer. John Hunt, a steady and valuable performer, fills out the backfield. Up front, the assets include huge Tackles Ron Petty (230) and Bill Sammons (235) and Guards Jerry Smith (190) and Steve Hladio (215)—a hard-hitting foursome. Offensively, Camp is thinking in terms of an accelerated passing attack. Defensively, Camp fears his linebackers may be inadequate and that this could be a costly shortcoming.

MARYLAND
1959 RECORD: WON 5, LOST 5

Coach Tom Nugent must repair his football abode. The I-shaped house that Tom built was torn apart by graduation winds, with the front wall stripped from tackle to tackle. But all is not ruined, for Nugent can rebuild with players who saw considerable service last fall. Tackle Bill Kirchiro and Guard Pete Boinis are the pillars of the forward foundation. Vince Scott and Gary Collins are the finest pair of ends in the ACC, and the latter, a 6-foot-3 junior, has already attracted the pro scouts. Under the more liberal substitution rule, on offense Nugent will use Quarterbacks Dale Betty, a nifty passer, and Dick Novak, a tricky runner. Speedster Dwayne Fletcher will bring along a 4.8-yard rushing average at left half. Under Nugent's I formation the right halfback's main function is as a blocker, and Everett Cloud handles this assignment well. Pat Drass is the only dependable fullback left at this hard-luck spot. Guard Joe Hrezo is the most promising sophomore.

MEMPHIS STATE
1959 RECORD: WON 6, LOST 4

Last autumn the Tigers played more games and enjoyed them more, winning more often than they lost. This season, their first as a major college competitor, Coach Bill Murphy's squad will be facing Mississippi, VMI and Abilene Christian in the course of a tough 10-game schedule. Jim Earl Wright was injured a good part of 1959, played in just three games, but did so well that he is expected to shoulder most of the offensive chores in 1960. He should get a substantial amount of help from Jack Carter, who completed 16 of 19 passes, and between the two of them they may put a greater emphasis on the passing game. Sophomore John Griffin, who had a 5.6-yard rushing mark as a freshman, is the only dependable halfback. The team also is exactly one-deep at fullback, where Paul Parish is in charge. In the line there are six tested tackles (Wayne Armstrong and Don McKinnon are the best), and five returning guards, led by Miller Mathews and Larry Heathcott.

MIAMI
1959 RECORD: WON 6, LOST 4

Hurricanes are supposed to have feminine names, but Coach Andy Gustafson feels he has one named Jack Novak, a 6-foot-2 guard who can do everything. Miami's roster lists 24 monogram men, including a pair of sturdy tackles—John O'Day (226 pounds) and Charles Linning (230). And then there is End Bill Miller, who with 33 pass catches ranked fifth nationally last year. Despite the lack of an experienced center, the line should put up a stormy resistance to advances by enemy ball carriers. A potential trouble spot in the backfield is quarterback, the position vacated by Fran Curci. Top candidates are Bobby Weaver, a junior college transfer who can hit with a pass, and Eddie Johns, a sophomore who can run. Neither, unfortunately, can do both. Jim Vollenweider, a fine and durable runner, will shift from right to left half, and leading ground-gainer Frank Bouffard will return at fullback. Gustafson's offense will be wide open, and he will augment it with a lonesome end.

MISSISSIPPI
1959 RECORD: WON 9, LOST 1

Like clouds on a rainy day, top-flight players come from every corner to bolster the Rebels. Coach Johnny Vaught might have missed the likes of End Larry Grantham. Guard Marv Terrell, Quarterback Bobby Franklin, Halfback Cowboy Woodruff and Fullback Charlie Flowers were it not for a rain of new talent. For example, at end there is Johnny Brewer, who throws a block as well as anyone and who can hang on to a pass. At guard there is Dick Price, a one-man wall on defense. And there are two outstanding new linemen—Guard Treva Bolin and Tackle Jim Dunaway. At quarterback Jake Gibbs, who completed 46 of 96 throws last year, ran for 228 yards and led the SEC in total offense, is among the best signal callers in college. George Blair (who got five yards a try last year) has few peers as an all-round halfback, and Bobby Crespino (4.7) can cut loose at any time. Fullback Jim Anderson's power is reflected in an odd but convincing statistic. Last year he gained 318 yards and lost just one.

MISSISSIPPI SOUTHERN
1959 RECORD: WON 6, LOST 4

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