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The Southwest
Mervin Hyman
September 19, 1960
The wires are humming with big news from the Southwest. The word is that Texas football is going to be as wild on the ground as in the air this fall
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September 19, 1960

The Southwest

The wires are humming with big news from the Southwest. The word is that Texas football is going to be as wild on the ground as in the air this fall

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We are optimistic, but realistic" is the simple and sound way Coach Jim LaRue has put it. With a set of fast-moving backs, he can be optimistic. With a set of light linemen, he must be realistic. Quarterback Eddie Wilson is credited with bringing in three of the Wildcats' four wins last fall, twice with clutch kicks, once with a series of radarlike passes. There is a plethora of halfbacks. The two prime ground-gainers—Warren Livingston (380 yards at a 6.7 clip in 1959) and Walt Mince (275 and 6.1)—will return to a thundering ground attack. And there is an addition—jack rabbit Joe Hernandez, a junior college transfer whose flashy moves remind Arizonans of their finest runner ever, Art Luppino. Biggest man on a line that will average a mere 195 pounds will be Tackle Tony Matz (205), a fierce tackier and blocker who last season played more than 500 minutes. End Don Wild, Tackle Jim Osborne and Guards Ted Urness and John Smull are old hands.

ARIZONA STATE
1959 RECORD: WON 10, LOST 1

Jones is a plain name, but when it belongs to Nolan it can become memorable. Although he is only 5 feet 8 and 165 pounds, Nolan Jones is an express runner and he can work marvels when he gets the ball. In 1959 he tied for second in national scoring with 100 points. He carried the ball 143 times at an average of almost five yards a try, caught 10 passes for 156 yards and four touchdowns and booted 21 of 25 PATs and three field goals. His running mate will be John McFalls, who just happens to have a 5.5 rushing average. Joe Zuger, fourth nationally with a 44.8 punting mark, and Bob Cosner will split the quarterbacking. The most amazing thing about this backfield is that these four are juniors. Coach Frank Kush admits to a need for a fullback and a few ends, key men in his multiple wing T. Still, after winning 17 of 21 games in two years, he finds it hard to wipe the smile from his face. Jesse Bradford, a 190-pound tackle, is typical of the light, quick-hitting Arizona State line.

ARKANSAS
1959 RECORD: WON 8, LOST 2

Lance Alworth is back, and what better news can a team have? Alworth, who can take off faster than a moonshiner, will shift to left half now that Jim Mooty has graduated. This is his natural position, and he should be one of the nation's best climax runners. Appreciative Coach Frank Broyles is almost as high on two special fullbacks, Joe Paul Alberty and Curtis Cox, both of whom fit neatly into his quick, fast-breaking "belly-wing" attack. The Razorbacks' passer will be George McKinney, who will have to go it alone, however, now that the No. 2 quarterback has been expelled. Another loss leaves right half to Darrell and Jarrell, the Williams twins. Linebacker Wayne Harris, as vicious a tackier as the SWC has, calks the defense. Tackle Marlin Epp and Guard Dean Garrett tower in a line that is small and in need of replacements. Broyles's real difficulty is a good second unit, so vital to his highly organized, beautifully planned style of play. An added woe is the lack of a good kicker.

BAYLOR
1959 RECORD: WON 4, LOST 6

The three Rs of the Backfield—Ronnie Stanley, Ronnie Goodwin and Ronnie Bull—will teach the opposition many a lesson this fall. Quarterback Stanley "reads" the defense well and excels on short passes. Goodwin at halfback has a twisting-turning style that will cause a lot of stories to be written. And Halfback Bull, a climax runner who should be one of the nation's most acclaimed players by year's end, will send Baylor's scoreboard arithmetic soaring. Bull does the 100 in 9.8 and this, plus power and a deceptive change of pace, makes him as dynamic a runner as his name would lead you to believe. Bobby Ply will also see a lot of action at quarter in Coach John Bridgers' Baltimore Colt T. The line averages only a little over 200 pounds and it is made up of veterans who will be opening holes a bit wider, bringing down opposing runners a bit sooner. Sonny Davis, who grabs passes with the ease of a pickpocket, has a claque of pro scouts following his every move.

HARDIN-SIMMONS
1959 RECORD: WON 3, LOST 7

Gone with the wind of graduation are nine starters, including half of the first-string backfield. Coach Howard McChesney, who replaces Sammy Baugh, has switched Sammy Oates, the heralded deaf mute, from end to fullback. Oates last year was 19th in the country in pass receiving and has the equipment to make the changeover. The loss of Quarterback Jim Tom Butler is not a severe blow, for he alternated with Harold (Hayseed) Stephens, who ranked 20th (69 of 136 for 692 yards) in national passing statistics. Mike Payne is a sophomore with a valuable asset—the ability to go for a touchdown from a long way out. He did just that in the spring intrasquad game, galloping 91 yards with a kickoff return. The right half, or slotback, in this slot-T attack will be Bruce Arrant. Passing will be the big weapon, and the Cowboys are fortunate to have some grabby ends. Bill Voss does everything well and last year hauled in 30 tosses and placed 11th nationally. Gil Pelton is a big asset at guard.

HOUSTON
1959 RECORD: WON 3, LOST 7

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