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POINT OF FACT
Mort Lund
December 12, 1960
A ski quiz to test the ingenuity and add to the knowledge of both the weekend skier and the armchair expert
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December 12, 1960

Point Of Fact

A ski quiz to test the ingenuity and add to the knowledge of both the weekend skier and the armchair expert

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? What is the longest recognized continuous run from a lift?

?The run from the upper end of the Chamonix lift to the base. It includes a stretch that crosses the famous Vall´┐Że Blanche glacier and is 13 miles long.

? What lift reaches the highest altitude?

?The rope tow on top of Chacaltaya peak in the Bolivian Andes that goes up to the 15,000-foot level.

? How fast can a skier go on snow?

?Nearly as fast as a man dropped from a plane (a falling human can go no faster than 120 miles an hour because of wind resistance). In the first modern ski speed trial Ralph Miller was timed by stop watch at 109 miles an hour in 1954 at Portillo, Chile. This year at Cervinia, Italy, however, the winner of the electrically timed world speed trials was an Italian named Luigi di Marco, who went 102 miles an hour. A skier in a fast downhill race will reach 70 mph at some point and average better than 60 mph.

? How far can a jumper leap off a modern ski hill?

?Theoretically, there is no limit, provided the jump is built big enough. The largest jumps shoot the skier well beyond the 400-foot mark, with the skier sailing off at 85-90 miles an hour. Tauno Luiro of Finland set the current world record in 1951 when he jumped 456 feet at Oberstdorf, Germany.

? Where was the first U.S. ski tow built?

?At Woodstock, Vt. in 1934, when local skiers strung up a rope tow.

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