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CLEVELAND INDIANS
April 10, 1961
A solid first team, with Jim Piersall promising no more of last year's antics, will make the Indians tough all year long. Injuries, however, would hurt this benchless club
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April 10, 1961

Cleveland Indians

A solid first team, with Jim Piersall promising no more of last year's antics, will make the Indians tough all year long. Injuries, however, would hurt this benchless club

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1960 TEAM PERFORMANCE

FINISHED

WON

LOST

GAMES BEHIND

4

76

78

21

1960 INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCES

BATTING

PITCHING

Francona

.292

Perry

18-10

Power

.288

Grant

9-8

Piersall

.282

Latman

7-7

HOME RUNS

RUNS BATTED IN

Held

21

Power

84

Kirkland

21

Francona

79

Piersall

18

Held

67

ANALYSIS OF THE INDIANS

STRONG POINTS
Cleveland will field eight regulars shaded in ability and performance only by the Yankees. Infield of Vic Power, Johnny Temple, Woodie Held and Bubba Phillips outstanding both offensively and defensively. Power, peerless with first baseman's glove, had .288 BA, drove in 84 runs. Held, out with injuries part of year, hit 21 HRs in only 109 games. Temple, also subpar physically, should rebound after .268 season. Phillips, although mediocre with bat, is speedy and able afield. Outfield stronger than most. Center Fielder Jim Piersall will try to set slower pace on and off field, avoid 1960's late-season slump. Ex-Giant Willie Kirkland hits with power (57 HRs in three years). So does Left Fielder Tito Francona, now an established major leaguer after second solid season (.292, 79 RBIs). John Romano set home run record for Cleveland catchers with 16, hit .272.

WEAK SPOTS
Reserves, second-line pitching. Team has no reserve outfielders with major league experience, and among infielders only journeyman Joe Morgan is dry behind ears. Except for Bobby Locke (3.37 ERA), second-line starters are unimpressive: Jim Grant 4.39, Wynn Hawkins 4.23, Barry Latman 4.04, Dick Stigman 4.50.

THE BIG IFS
First-line pitching, relief pitching. Only sure winner on staff is lanky Jim Perry, who took 18 games last year, 12 the year before. Gary Bell, who won five of first six in 1960, developed shoulder hitch in midseason and is not completely rid of it. He must win big if club is to be serious contender. Johnny Antonelli, acquired from Giants in Kuenn deal, could more than make up for Bell if he can settle down in American League. Big problem for Manager Jimmy Dykes is finding assistance for Reliever Frank Funk, fireballing right-hander who last year excelled for Cleveland in September (four victories, 1.97 ERA) after recall from Toronto. With Johnny Klippstein (2.92 ERA) gone in draft, prospects for help are slim.

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES
Major additions are, of course, Antonelli and Kirkland. Woodie Held will move to third base if Jack Kubiszyn can hit enough to take over at shortstop. Kubiszyn, who has good range and an accurate arm, batted .336 at Mobile. Dapper Walter Bond, 6 feet 6 and 228 pounds, is back for another try after year of seasoning in minors.

OUTLOOK
If Bell and Antonelli have big years, club could win. If they don't, club won't.

JAMES J. AND FRANK L.

In a corner of the Cleveland Indians' dressing room was James Joseph Dykes, manager. Dykes sat in the Dykes fashion—legs crossed, right elbow on right knee, right hand supporting large cigar. He also talked in Dykes fashion—short bursts mixed with long sentences, all heavily larded with cuss words and throaty laughter.

"What's Frank Lane doing, Jimmy?" asked a sportswriter. "Maybe he's trying to trade for you. He did it before."

"Yeah," said Dykes, "but he realized what a mistake that was. He got away from me again as quick as he could."

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