SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
September 17, 1962
AUTO RACING—LARRY FRANK of Greenville, S.C. was the winner of the Southern 500-mile NASCAR race in Darlington. S.C, but it took him a long time (see page 13). Nearly seven hours after Robert (Junior) Johnson of Ronda. N.C. was declared winner, the confused officials rechecked the scoring and found an unaccountable error; they had completely missed one lap. Frank got the $21,730 winner's purse, and Johnson dropped to second place. Frank, in a Ford, and Johnson, in a Pontiac, both covered the hot (track-surface temperature, 145�) 500 miles in a blisteringly close 117 mph, finishing only .039 mph apart.
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September 17, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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AUTO RACING—LARRY FRANK of Greenville, S.C. was the winner of the Southern 500-mile NASCAR race in Darlington. S.C, but it took him a long time (see page 13). Nearly seven hours after Robert (Junior) Johnson of Ronda. N.C. was declared winner, the confused officials rechecked the scoring and found an unaccountable error; they had completely missed one lap. Frank got the $21,730 winner's purse, and Johnson dropped to second place. Frank, in a Ford, and Johnson, in a Pontiac, both covered the hot (track-surface temperature, 145�) 500 miles in a blisteringly close 117 mph, finishing only .039 mph apart.

BUNK MOORE slammed to a stop during a 125-lap stock car race in Monroe, N.C. when a rival, Pat Nixon, cracked up. Moore turned his car broadside to keep other racers from piling into the flaming wreck and dragged the unconscious Nixon to safety. Then he roared back into the race, and won it.

BOATING—BILL MUNCEY, 33, the. nearly unbeatable Seattle speedster, nervily navigated Miss Century 21 through a 15-mile course dangerously sprinkled with storm-loosened debris, sweeping all three heats of the Governor's Cup at Madison, Ind. Muncey thus retired the cup he had won twice previously, and collected his third straight unlimited hydro national championship.

Ondine, S.A. Long's aluminum yawl, comfortably whipped 82 boats in the 233-mile Stamford-Vineyard race through Long Island Sound. Long, a Park Avenue ship broker, won the new North American Racing Trophy for the best record in six East Coast ocean races. He then sent Ondine off on a 70-day trip to Australia for the Sydney-Hobart ocean race, which will make her the first American entry to compete in the event.

BRIDGE—JULES WRIGHT, a Yale senior and an occasional player, drew a hand that the law of probability says is a 635,013,559,600-to-one-shot—13 spades. Wright, playing with his mother and two friends in Wilmington, Del., made 3,280 points on the hand, doubled, redoubled and vulnerable.

FOOTBALL—AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE opened in Denver before an SRO crowd of 28,000—largest ever to see a pro game there—which roared delightedly as Jack Faulkner's recharged Broncos upset San Diego 30-21. Houston beat Buffalo 28-23 in Buffalo. Fullback Charlie Tolar sprinted 19 yards for the Oilers' first touchdown of the season, and Quarterback George Blanda showed up the Bills' pass defense. Halfback Abner Haynes scored four touchdowns as Dallas downed the Boston Patriots, 42-28, in Dallas. With newcomer Lee Grosscup leading the way with three touchdown passes (he signed with the Titans only two days earlier). New York beat Oakland in Oakland, Calif. 28-17.

GAMES—JAPAN won gold medals in volleyball and tennis to complete its domination over 16 other nations competing in the Fourth Asian Games in Jakarta. The Japanese finished with 1,137� points. Host Indonesia was a pallid runner-up with 401�.

GOLF—JACK NICKLAUS, driving hard and putting neatly, beat Arnold Palmer and Gary Player in the $75,000 World Series of Golf at the Firestone Country Club in Akron (sec page 26). With a brilliant show of sub-par golf on one of the country's most demanding courses, Nicklaus shot a 66 and a 69 for a total of 135, 5 under par. Player and Palmer tied at 139.

HORSE RACING—CANDY SPOTS ($6.60), cut oil at the start, still managed to break through a 12-horse field to win the first running of the $357,250 [ Arlington-Washington Futurity in Chicago (see page 54). the world's richest race. Rex Ellsworth, who thought Candy Spots was a slow developer, grudgingly entered the 2-year-old after Jockey Willie Shoemaker urged him to. Shoemaker then proceeded to urge Candy Spots through a drizzle to cover the seven furlongs in a fast 1:21[4/5]. He beat favored Never Bend by half a length.

Rambunctious ($13.60) took the $114,910 World's Playground Stakes at Atlantic City after a breathless duel through the stretch with Be Somebody. Getting his first big stake victory, the only Jersey-bred entry in the 12-horse field zipped through seven furlongs in 1:22[4/5] to win by a head. Earlier, a flabbergasted crowd watched highly favored Kelso lose. Running in what amounted to a workout for this week's big United Nations Handicap, Kelso just didn't have it. He finished fourth behind the winner. Call the Witness ($26.60).

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