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A roundup of the sports information of the week
September 24, 1962
BOATING—WEATHERLY, driven by a crisp 10-to-20-knot west-northwest wind, easily beat Gretel in the opening race for the America's Cup before 20,000 happy spectators who watched from 2,000 assorted craft (see page 28).
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September 24, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BOATING—WEATHERLY, driven by a crisp 10-to-20-knot west-northwest wind, easily beat Gretel in the opening race for the America's Cup before 20,000 happy spectators who watched from 2,000 assorted craft (see page 28).

Bill Muncey, who has proved unbeatable on the unlimited hydro circuit this season, scored 1,200 points in winning all his heats in the President's Cup race. Roaring past 50,000 spectators lined along the Potomac River, Muncey pushed Miss Century 21 to a screaming 109.157 average speed in taking the trophy for the second straight year.

James Payton, 34, brought a breezy freshness to the surging tidal waters of Newport, Calif. in winning the Mallory Cup, the North American sailing championship (see page 33). Payton, a Wisconsin lake sailor who had never even seen the Pacific, let alone gotten wet in it, whisked the prize from under the sunburned noses of seven regional champs.

BOXING—RALPH DUPAS, New Orleans welterweight, fined $500 for being a pound and a quarter overweight for his match against British champion Brian Curvis, had injury added to insult when he was disqualified in the sixth round for butting and assessed an additional $280.

Eder Jofre, Brazil's world bantamweight champion who has not lost in 46 bouts, easily kept his crown in a title defense, his third, with Mexico's Jos� Medel in S�o Paulo. Jofre waited through five rounds, then knocked Medel out in the sixth.

COURT TENNIS—OXFORD-CAMBRIDGE out-pointed the Junior (under 25) U.S. Court Tennis Association team 7-4 in three days of play in New York. England thus won the James Van Alen trophy for the third time since the international matches began in 1956.

FOOTBALL—NFL: CLEVELAND rolled over New York 17-7 in Cleveland, as the powerful Browns, ably led by Quarterback Jim Ninowski, sparkled with some rare razzle-dazzle in the big game of opening day. In Detroit, Halfback Pat Studstill set up two touchdowns for the Lions as they crushed Pittsburgh 45-7. Maybe it was the dismayed boos of Baltimore fans that urged Johnny Unitas into throwing two touchdown passes in the second half to help the Colts overcome Los Angeles 30-27. Paul Hornung picked up right where he left off last year, scoring 28 points for Green Bay as the Packers predictably outpowered Minnesota 34-7 in Green Bay. St. Louis invaded Philadelphia and, with the help of John David Crow, who scored three touchdowns, sacked the Eagles 27-21. Bobby Mitchell, the first Negro ever to play for Washington, did most of the scoring for his team in Dallas (18 points) but the two Cowboy quarterbacks, Don Meredith and Eddie LeBaron, were equally as good as the game ended in a 35-35 tie. Chicago's fast Willie Galimore ran 37 and 77 yards for two touchdowns as the Bears conquered San Francisco 30-14 in an upset win.

AFL: DENVER, up after their opening-game upset against San Diego, got up even more, defeating Buffalo 23-20 in Buffalo. Quarterback Frank Tripucka threw two touchdown passes in the second half. Babe Parilli's 32-yard run enlivened the Patriots, as Boston surprised Houston 34-21 in Boston and ended the Oilers' 11-game winning streak. Led by Halfback Keith Lincoln's 103-yard kickoff return, San Diego lost no time in downing New York 40-14 in San Diego.

GOLF—JACK NICKLAUS avoided one of golf's controversial playoffs (see page 20) by blasting a tremendous eagle on the 15th hole of the last round to win the $30,000 Seattle Open by two strokes over Tony Lema.

HARNESS RACING—LORD GORDON ($15) clouded the 3-year-old scene by upsetting the favorite and Triple Crown hopeful, A.C.'s Viking, in the Dexter Cup trot at Roosevelt Raceway. Guided by John Patterson, the winner flashed to the fore in the stretch, leaving the Viking and Driver Sanders Russell second in the mile-and-a-sixteenth race.

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