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A roundup of the sports information of the week
April 01, 1963
BASKETBALL—NBA: The St. Louis Hawks, led by Bob Pettit's three-game average of 36 points, were ahead of Detroit 2-1 in the best-of-five playoff series. The winner plays Los Angeles. In the Eastern Division, Cincinnati and Syracuse were tied at two games each. Boston will meet the winner.
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April 01, 1963

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASKETBALL—NBA: The St. Louis Hawks, led by Bob Pettit's three-game average of 36 points, were ahead of Detroit 2-1 in the best-of-five playoff series. The winner plays Los Angeles. In the Eastern Division, Cincinnati and Syracuse were tied at two games each. Boston will meet the winner.

Bartlesville ( Okla.) Oilers, led by Jerry Shipp's 22 points, routed the Denver D-C Truckers 100-70 and successfully defended their AAU basketball championship at Denver.

BOXING—DAVEY MOORE, 26, of Springfield, Ohio, died of an injury to the brain stem suffered in a defense of his world featherweight title in Los Angeles against Sugar Ramos of Mexico City. Ramos scored a 10th-round knockout over Moore to become the new champion (see page 18). On the same card, Luis Rodriguez of Miami took away Emile Griffith's world welterweight title in 15 rounds, and Roberto Cruz of the Philippines knocked out Raymundo (Battling) Torres of Mexico to win the world "junior" welterweight crown.

Willie Pastrano of Miami and WAYNE THORNTON of Bakersfield, Calif. fought to a draw in a lively light heavyweight bout at Madison Square Garden in New York.

GOLF—DAN SIKES, a slender, 32-year-old who deserted a law career to join the PGA tour, won the $50,000 Doral Open in Miami with a 72-hole, 5-under-par score of 283. National Public Links champion in 1958, Sikes's first major pro tournament victory was worth $9,000. Sam Snead, who limped through the tournament on a sore left foot, finished one stroke back. Tony Lema was third.

HOCKEY—NHL: TORONTO lost its last two games to Detroit but earlier tied Montreal 3-3 and won its first league championship in 15 years with a 35-23-12 record. Chicago, tied with Montreal going into its last game, beat Boston and took second place as the Canadiens were shut out 5-0 by fifth-place New York. Detroit finished fourth as Gordie Howe wrapped up his sixth league scoring title with 86 points on 38 goals and 48 assists. Boston was last.

HORSE RACING—AHOY ($5), running for the first time since he was injured in August, sailed out of the gate and was never headed as he won the $28,050 Swift Stakes for 3-year-olds at the Aqueduct season opener on a sloppy track. Ridden by Jockey Herberto Hinojosa, Ahoy went six furlongs in 1:10 3/5. KELSO ($3.60), coming out of a jam in the approach for the final turn, won the $109,750 John B. Campbell Handicap at Bowie and displaced Carry Back as the third-ranking millionaire horse in racing history. With Jockey Ismael Valenzuela up, the Bohemia Stables' 6-year-old gelding ran the 1[1/16] of a mile in 1:43, beating Crimson Satan by � of a length. Only Round Table and Nashua stand ahead of Kelso, who has now earned $1,218,767.

Tutankhamen ($5.90) surged into the lead after the final turn and won the 1�-mile, $41,335 Donn Handicap on the grass at Gulfstream Park by 2� lengths over El Loco. Under jockey Willie Shoemaker, Tutankhamen ran the distance in 2:26.

Fluctuate, a 16-year-old brown gelding ridden by Tommy Smith, won the 3�-mile Rokeby Bowl timber race in the Piedmont point-to-point races at Upperville, Va. It was Fluctuate's third victory in the event and the last race of his career.

MOTOR SPORTS—ENZO FERRARI, his cars as durable as ever, opened the 1963 season with a clean sweep at Sebring, taking the first six places, followed dutifully by British Jaguars and German Porsches (see page 68). The overall winner was the Ferrari prototype V-12 with Motorcyclist John Surtees and Italian Ludovico Scarfiotti driving.

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