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Herman Weiskopf
April 24, 1967
It was the bottom of the ninth inning and the fans at Yankee Stadium were cheering every pitch by rookie left-hander Bill Rohr of the Red Sox, who for eight innings had not allowed a hit. They had seen him persevere despite a severe bruise suffered when a ball ricocheted off his left leg in the sixth. And they were disarmed by the youthful verve (Rohr's vigorous motion sent his cap flying off on some pitches) of the 21-year-old, who, at 6'3" and 175 pounds is built more like Twiggy than Christy Mathewson. Rohr's no-hitter seemed lost when Tom Tresh led off the ninth with a drive to deep left, but Carl Yastrzemski raced back and made a spectacular falling catch. Now the young pitcher was within two outs of becoming the first player ever to pitch a no-hitter in his very first big-league game. He got Joe Pepitone on a soft fly ball, and then up stepped Elston Howard. With the count two and two, Rohr barely missed a strikeout when his curve dipped too low. His next curve did not dip at all, and Howard singled to right, spoiling the no-hitter. Rohr got the final out, a one-hit shutout and his first taste of real prominence and publicity. Rohr, who is part Cherokee, was raised by foster parents in California, and originally signed with Pittsburgh in 1963. The Pirates buried him in the low minors, never once letting him pitch in a game. Red Sox officials, wise to this hide-and-seek ploy, spotted him, drafted him in November of 1963 and started him on his way.
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April 24, 1967

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It was the bottom of the ninth inning and the fans at Yankee Stadium were cheering every pitch by rookie left-hander Bill Rohr of the Red Sox, who for eight innings had not allowed a hit. They had seen him persevere despite a severe bruise suffered when a ball ricocheted off his left leg in the sixth. And they were disarmed by the youthful verve (Rohr's vigorous motion sent his cap flying off on some pitches) of the 21-year-old, who, at 6'3" and 175 pounds is built more like Twiggy than Christy Mathewson. Rohr's no-hitter seemed lost when Tom Tresh led off the ninth with a drive to deep left, but Carl Yastrzemski raced back and made a spectacular falling catch. Now the young pitcher was within two outs of becoming the first player ever to pitch a no-hitter in his very first big-league game. He got Joe Pepitone on a soft fly ball, and then up stepped Elston Howard. With the count two and two, Rohr barely missed a strikeout when his curve dipped too low. His next curve did not dip at all, and Howard singled to right, spoiling the no-hitter. Rohr got the final out, a one-hit shutout and his first taste of real prominence and publicity. Rohr, who is part Cherokee, was raised by foster parents in California, and originally signed with Pittsburgh in 1963. The Pirates buried him in the low minors, never once letting him pitch in a game. Red Sox officials, wise to this hide-and-seek ploy, spotted him, drafted him in November of 1963 and started him on his way.

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