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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 20, 1971
PAPER COWBOYSSirs:Thumbs up to Mark Mulvoy (On Paper, Dallas Is the Best, Dec. 6) for realizing that this is the year of the Cowboys. They have yet to lose in Texas Stadium and they have not lost since Coach Tom Landry named Roger Staubach as the No. 1 quarterback. The change in the quarterback position could also change the luck of the El Foldos. If the Cowboys are just a "paper" team, how come their opponents are the ones who are being spindled and mutilated? Look for Dallas to come up on top in Super Bowl VI.DOUG ALLTENFranconia, N.H.
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December 20, 1971

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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PAPER COWBOYS
Sirs:
Thumbs up to Mark Mulvoy (On Paper, Dallas Is the Best, Dec. 6) for realizing that this is the year of the Cowboys. They have yet to lose in Texas Stadium and they have not lost since Coach Tom Landry named Roger Staubach as the No. 1 quarterback. The change in the quarterback position could also change the luck of the El Foldos. If the Cowboys are just a "paper" team, how come their opponents are the ones who are being spindled and mutilated? Look for Dallas to come up on top in Super Bowl VI.
DOUG ALLTEN
Franconia, N.H.

Sirs:
What—another article on the Cowboys? They have a good team on paper, but will discover, as they have in the past, a new way of choking. The Miami Dolphins will prove that they are the best team in football when they win the Super Bowl.
JOHN SHEA
College Point, N.Y.

VIEWS OF THE GAME
Sirs:
Dan Jenkins' article on the Oklahoma-Nebraska game {Nebraska Rides High, Dec. 6) left much to be desired. In my opinion, he was grossly unfair to a fine Oklahoma team. Anyone who viewed the game knows it was played on a near-equal basis. But if anyone who did not see the game reads Mr. Jenkins' article, he will be led to believe that Nebraska turned the close, exciting game into a rout. That, of course, is far from what actually happened.

You billed the game as a battle between Oklahoma's Wishbone-T offense and Nebraska's "immovable" defense. Check the statistics; they speak for themselves. The 467 yards Oklahoma's Wishbone amassed against Nebraska proved that the Nebraska defense is no longer so immovable. The Cornhuskers won the game, but the Sooners won the Wishbone War.
JEFF DICKINSON
Kirksville, Mo.

Sirs:
Dan Jenkins stated, "It is impossible to stir the pages of history and find one in which both teams performed so reputably for so long throughout the day."

It was a superb football game between two beautifully coached, explosive teams, but it does not stand alone. The 1946 Army-Notre Dame game was surely its equal. In terms of buildup, a word count of the sports pages of the major American newspapers would probably indicate that the 1946 clash was at least as anticipated as the 1971 battle. In terms of play, the Army-Notre Dame game was also perfectly executed. Two truly outstanding teams played up to and even beyond their capabilities. Each game reflected the best college football had to offer at that point in time, with the emphasis on defense in 1946 and on offense in 1971.

Two factors make the 1946 game even more memorable than the one played last Thanksgiving. First, Army met Notre Dame on a neutral field ( Yankee Stadium). Second, the outcome in 1946, a 0-0 tie, was a more accurate reflection of the quality of the two opponents. By midway in the second half of the Nebraska-Oklahoma game it was obvious that whoever had the ball last would win, since neither team could keep the other from scoring, which is to say the two teams were equal. In the Army-Notre Dame game one had the feeling that neither team would ever score, so perfect were the defenses. The final score reflected the basic equality.
STEPHEN E. AMBROSE
New Orleans

Sirs:
Dan Jenkins indicated that Joe Wylie was the last man to have a shot at tackling Johnny Rodgers on the first-quarter punt return. But the photograph on page 24 showed that the last Oklahoma defender with a chance was Jon Harrison, No. 12.

Films of the game have clearly and conclusively shown that Wylie was taken out of the play with a clip only 10 or 15 yards from where Rodgers gathered in the punt. John Atkins cut Wylie down from behind just as the Sooner speedster was ready to spill Rodgers. The intention here is not to downgrade a brilliant Cornhusker performance, only to correct a misconception.
BILL SHANKS JR.
Tulsa

DIANA'S DEPTH
Sirs:
This past summer I had the privilege of working with Diana Nyad (She Takes a Long Swim Off a Short Pier, Dec. 6) at Camp Ak-O-Mak. There I learned that marathon swimming is a grueling contest between woman (or man) and nature as well as a contest between competitors. It is possibly the most demanding sport in the world. The fastest or most well-conditioned swimmer does not always win. Rather, the one who has the most skill at reading tides and currents, the most luck and the most persistence (or stubbornness) wins.

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