SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 14, 1983
HUBIESir:Thank you for Bruce Newman's article on Coach Hubie Brown (The Gospel According to Hubie, Oct. 31). I have watched Brown closely ever since he arrived in Atlanta and turned a mediocre team into a winner. For the past two years I have observed him working enthusiastically with boys and girls at his camps, and I have heard him motivate executives at business meetings. Never has there been a man with more zeal for his work. He continually gives of himself to others and is a credit to the sport of basketball.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 14, 1983

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

HUBIE
Sir:
Thank you for Bruce Newman's article on Coach Hubie Brown (The Gospel According to Hubie, Oct. 31). I have watched Brown closely ever since he arrived in Atlanta and turned a mediocre team into a winner. For the past two years I have observed him working enthusiastically with boys and girls at his camps, and I have heard him motivate executives at business meetings. Never has there been a man with more zeal for his work. He continually gives of himself to others and is a credit to the sport of basketball.

I find it particularly interesting that Michael Gearon, the Hawks' president, who put Brown "on the street," has seen fit to hire Hubie's disciple, Mike Fratello, as the teams head coach.
MICHAEL P. FLAHERTY
Norcross, Ga.

Sir:
Hubie Brown obviously did not have an easy life growing up, but how does he justify his holier-than-thou attitude when judging—and belittling—others, such as Bill Russell? As a fan from way back (1940s), I feel that CBS made a big mistake in replacing Russell on its NBA telecasts this season. History will show who goes down as contributing more to mankind and basketball, Brown or Russell.
RODD BUCK
Toledo

Sir:
I am appalled by the gall of Hubie Brown in attempting to discredit all that Bill Russell has done for the game of basketball and to compound that with his utterly tasteless remark concerning Russell's character.

Russell needs no one to defend him. His contribution to the sport is unparalleled. More than that, his positive influence as a strong-minded, intelligent and extremely articulate person stands as the epitome of a class athlete and a class individual.

I am proud to know Bill Russell and to count him as a friend.
NANCY AUERBACH
Washington

Sir:
Bill Russell's 11 NBA championships, two NCAA titles and Olympic gold medal will be remembered and admired long after the pejorative bleats of a career loser fade away.
JOHN TOWNLEY
North Dartmouth, Mass.

Sir:
Brown teaches people to be positive thinkers, yet he appears to be a very negative person, always saying negative things about fellow coaches and players. I guess his philosophy is "Do as I say, not as I do."
THE REV. H. WILLIAM DAMBACH
Upper Buffalo Presbyterian Church
Washington, Pa.

RALPH & CO.
Sir:
In his article on Ralph Sampson (It's Just a Matter of Time, Oct. 31) Anthony Cotton asks. "Will Sampson be the big man of the '80s? Or will he be another Chamberlain, with gaudy numbers but little to show for them?"

Wilt Chamberlain has plenty to show for all his numbers. He was one of the most outstanding athletes of all time. Most of Chamberlain's career came during the Bill Russell era, and Wilt and his inferior teams always had to play second fiddle to Russell and the Celtics. Given that circumstance, Chamberlain needn't take a backseat to anyone. He was the best. For Sampson's sake I hope he can do half as well as Chamberlain.
BILL MUCHNICK
Olivette, Mo.

Continue Story
1 2