SI Vault
 
May Madness
JACK McCALLUM
May 12, 2008
With stars young and old excelling, and the top eight seeds still in pursuit of the title, the NBA playoffs are only going to get wilder
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 12, 2008

May Madness

With stars young and old excelling, and the top eight seeds still in pursuit of the title, the NBA playoffs are only going to get wilder

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2 3

James rarely deviates from the vanilla script he follows on and off the court. In Cleveland's first-round series against the Washington Wizards, he was often the target of hard fouls—reserve Darius Songaila was suspended for what turned out to be the final game for hitting James in the face two nights earlier—and was called overrated by guards DeShawn Stevenson and Gilbert Arenas. But like a cagey trout who has seen it all before, James refused to snap at the bait. After the Cavs' series-clinching Game 6 win, after Stevenson had been returned to the NBA obscurity he so richly deserves and Arenas sent back to his blog, James's post--Game 5 words resonated: "As long as I'm on the court, we have a great chance to win." It didn't even come across as bragging; it was a simple statement of fact.

James's off-the-charts maturity contrasts with that of the Celtics' Paul Pierce, against whom he will be matched often in the Eastern semifinal that was scheduled to begin on Tuesday in Boston. While James was restrained yet disdainful toward his lesser first-round tormentors, Pierce lost it on a couple of occasions. He was fined $25,000 for the "menacing gesture" he made toward the Hawks bench in Game 3. (It still isn't clear whether the three-fingered sign was gang-related or an expression of "blood, sweat and tears," as Celtics executive director of basketball operations Danny Ainge claimed.) Then, after fouling out with 4:44 left in Game 6, Pierce was hit with a technical for throwing his headband, a crucial mistake—in a game Atlanta would win by three points—that one might have expected from the callow Hawks rather than the 30-year-old Pierce.

Fortunately for the Celtics, they have the more responsible and mature Kevin Garnett. After point guard Rajon Rondo was knocked to the floor on a hard third-quarter foul by Atlanta forward Marvin Williams on Sunday, it was the Big Ticket who got to Rondo (once he shook off the cobwebs) and said, "You did a great job. Keep your head and make your free throws." Rondo did. Later in the quarter it was Garnett who, after being called for a moving screen on center Zaza Pachulia, resisted the temptation—as tempting as it was with a huge lead—to engage Pachulia, who had confronted Garnett in Game 4.

Garnett has never been considered anything but a steadfast leader. The difference is that James, 8 1/2 years his junior, is considered a leader and a prime-time postseason performer. This series represents Garnett's chance to become the same.

Wild and Crazy Guys

Whether the Pistons are playing well or badly, they are out there on their own, insular and self-contained, impossible to deconstruct, the sole residents of Planet Piston. Even coach Flip Saunders can't figure out his players or rein them in. Sometimes they curse and scream at one another, and sometimes they curse and scream at the refs. Yet at other times they effect a composure that's almost eerie. During Game 6 of their first-round series against the 76ers in Philadelphia, for example, forward Rasheed Wallace, Detroit's lightning rod and most fiery personality, was getting ripped unmercifully by fans in the front row for that strange gray spot in his hair. Sheed said nothing, didn't even so much as glance at them.

It remains to be seen what kind of attitude the Pistons will carry through the second round. Boston went into the postseason as the clear favorite in the East with aging Detroit perceived as not sufficiently motivated, probably not up to the task. Now with the Celtics' taking seven to dispatch the Hawks and the Pistons' winning their last four games (through Sunday) by an average of 17.0 points, the tag of Eastern favorite falls once again upon the Bad Boys 2.0. Opponents are saying the same things they said in '04, when the starters who remain in Detroit's lineup—Billups, Wallace, guard Rip Hamilton and forward Tayshaun Prince—were bullying their way to the championship. "Their defense wears on you," says Magic coach Stan Van Gundy.

During warmups an hour before last Saturday night's Game 1 tip-off, as Orlando assistant coach Patrick Ewing tossed entry passes into the Magic big men, he rarely took his eyes off the Pistons' side of the floor. What's with these guys? Ewing's gaze seemed to suggest.

Everyone else is wondering the same thing.

Kobe's Final Act of Redemption?

Continue Story
1 2 3