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Letters
October 01, 1990
BORIS BECKER Thanks to Curry Kirkpatrick for opening our eyes to one of a vanishing breed of athletes, tennis player Boris Becker (Eye of the Tiger, Aug. 27). Becker epitomizes the sportsmanship we were taught as children: Respect your opponent, play to win, be fair, be a gracious winner and never be a sore loser. Above all, we learned that a sport was to be enjoyed. How times have changed. GEORGE R. MOORE Brentwood, Mo.
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October 01, 1990

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?Actually, both Fisk and Bench hit homers when playing positions other than catcher, but the 327 home runs we mentioned in the item reflect only those homers hit as catchers. Counting all home runs, Bench still leads with 389 to Fisk's 353.—ED.

A PEACH OF A BAT
Your story about autograph collecting (Back Off!, Aug. 13) brought to mind a miniature Ty Cobb bat that I recently inherited from my father. I know that he inherited it from his father and that it was made approximately 70 years ago by the Hillerich & Bradsby Company. Can you find out something about this bat for me?
JOE HAMILTON
Oxnard, Calif.

?According to Joshua Evans of Lelands, a sports memorabilia auction house in New York City, Hillerich & Bradsby made several thousand of these bats decorated with decals from about 1912 to '15. They came in three sizes, the smallest, like this one, about 15 inches long; midsize, about 22 inches; and full size, 30 inches and longer. The bats were sold as souvenirs, and fewer than 50 are known to be extant. Evans says that this Georgia Peach bat, which appears to be in good condition, is worth from $1,500 to $2,000. The Cobb bats are the most valuable. Others featured stars like Eddie Collins, Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie and Honus Wagner.—ED.

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