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SCORECARD
Edited by Alexander Wolff
September 03, 1990
CASTING A SHADOW
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September 03, 1990

Scorecard

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As little league baseball was preparing to crown a new champion (page 24), the hero of last year's World Series, Chris Drury, was celebrating his 14th birthday in a leafy cul-de-sac in Trumbull, Conn., with a half-dozen pals and Series vets. They gathered at the home of his next-door neighbors, the Wheelers, and Drury drove a Wiffle ball over the two-story house. "Did you see it?" shrieked 13-year-old Bobby Wheeler. "Chris hit the longest homer ever!"

The boys of last summer are still very much boys. Chris, who pitched the U.S. past Taiwan 5-2 for the 1989 title, has shed 15 pounds to make himself quicker on hockey skates. First baseman Kenny Martin has shot up three inches to 6'1". Third baseman Jason Hairston has passed up Babe Ruth ball for soccer. Leftfielder Danny McGrath has returned to his native Australia. And catcher Todd Halky has come to grips with the disappointment of not getting to play in the final game. Says Todd, "I've got to get on with my life."

At a reunion bash the day before Chris's birthday party, the kids chose to play ball rather than rehash their victory and subsequent visit to the White House. "We get together all the time, anyway," says Martin with a shrug.

Outfielder Matt Sewell may have grown up the most. He had been a stalwart on the Trumbull team before breaking his left wrist in a bicycle accident just before the '89 state tournament. Because he was replaced on the roster and didn't travel with the team to Williamsport, Pa., for the Series, Little League pooh-bahs wouldn't let him keep a commemorative jersey. Only after news of his case created a minor uproar—hockey star Wayne Gretzky was prepared to spring for the cost of a jersey—did they reverse themselves. "I felt left out," Matt says. "Then I was relieved when 1 finally got it. I guess you could say I was kind of naive before this."

But has having the jersey at last helped him meet girls? In a word, says Matt. "No."
—HANK HERSCH

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