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NOW IT GETS SERIOUS
Richard Hoffer
June 11, 1990
After beating Seamus McDonagh, Evander Holyfield may finally get his shot
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June 11, 1990

Now It Gets Serious

After beating Seamus McDonagh, Evander Holyfield may finally get his shot

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Arum, who shrewdly has Foreman fighting on the undercard of Tyson's June 16 bout with Henry Tillman, says, "You know what would be a bigger fight? Tyson-Foreman, without the title."

Does it sound as if Holy-field, whose moniker has been Real Deal, is getting a raw deal? The WBA is in charge of conducting purse bids for a Douglas-Holyfield match, but on May 19 Dan Duva's attorney, Pat English, heard that Jose Sulaiman, who runs the rival WBC and is a close ally of King's, had implied that he was not going to recognize the WBA purse bids. But after the Holy-field-McDonagh fight, James Binns, the WBA counsel, declared that purse bids would be conducted by his organization on June 10 and that boxing's third governing body, the IBF, would go along. Then English stood up and said he had been told by an attorney for the WBC that that organization would honor those bids as well. Meanwhile, Douglas still intends to fight Holyfield, no matter how disappointing the purse.

To forestall Holyfield any longer would be absurd. He has fought five ranked boxers in a row, and it is interesting to note that Tyson and Foreman have found their own comeback fodder—Adilson Rodrigues and Tillman, respectively—among Holyfield's KO victims. That alone, says Dan Duva, qualifies McDonagh for a big payday with one of the two.

Holyfield's willingness to fight the likes of McDonagh is laudable, given that he had everything to lose. Had he been tagged with a lucky knockout punch—he has been hit hard in each of his last three fights—or even been disappointing in victory, Holyfield could have lost his No. 1 ranking and thus his right to a title fight.

"My main concern is to be active," Holyfield had said to Dan Duva, who had been torn by the idea that Holyfield might risk all by fighting a nobody. It now seems likely that Holyfield will get his shot at a unified title, however reduced in economic worth it might be. If he does, we need only recall the words of Lou Duva, Dan's father and Holyfield's trainer, to characterize this past week in boxing: "All sound and fury, signifyin' nut'n."

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