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A SOUTH SIDE REVIVAL
Steve Rushin
May 28, 1990
The Chicago White Sox have a new-look team for next year's new home
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May 28, 1990

A South Side Revival

The Chicago White Sox have a new-look team for next year's new home

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"I'll be more happy in the other stadium," says Calderon. "I can get my home runs." He believes, without any evidence whatsoever, that the wind always blows in at old Comiskey and that at new Comiskey, where home plate faces in a different direction, the wind will always blow out.

Donn Pall knows better. He gets to watch most games from the bullpen, from where he is occasionally called on to pitch in relief. A Sox fanatic all his life, Pall grew up in Evergreen Park, a 20-minute drive from Comiskey. He is a delightful person who only speaks ill of the Cubs and who hates Wrigley Field with every fiber of his being. "I know I'm going to end up there someday," he says. "That would not be good."

Pall has suffered. "Seventy-seven and '83 were exciting," he says. "Before and after? Nothing." He was 17 on July 12, 1979, when he brought a record to Disco Demolition Night and got in to the ballpark for 98 cents. He felt the heat as Comiskey's centerfield went up in a bonfire of bad music between games of a twinight doubleheader. He was miffed when the ensuing riot forced the Sox to forfeit the nightcap. "I was one of about three people who actually wanted to see the second game," he says.

Pall left town only to tour the minors. He played at Birmingham in 1987, the year the Barons' Rickwood Field was condemned, and by all preseason forecasts, so was the team. "But we had a scrappy team," he says. "A lot like this one."

The Barons won a championship in that final season in the rickety park. "So I believe," says Pall. "It can happen."

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