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SCORECARD
Edited by Jack McCallum
December 20, 1993
Knight Errant
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December 20, 1993

Scorecard

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Winter Wonderland War

Tensions between skiers and snowboarders, the latter being those generally younger and more radical individuals who fly down the mountain on giant wheelless skateboards, are at an alltime high. A recent National Skier Opinion Survey revealed that 41% of all skiers are "nervous" about snowboarders. SI has no answer for their fears, but for those of you unfamiliar with the two factions, we offer the following primer:

Skier

Snowboarder

AVERAGE AGE

21

15

FASHION STATEMENT

Coordinated pastels

Clownlike pants, nose ring

FAVORITE BOOK

Anything by John Grisham

Anything by DC Comics

WHAT'S ON WALKMAN?

R.E.M., U2, Phil Collins

Sprung Monkey, Biohazard

TV TASTES

Seinfeld, 60 Minutes

ESPN2; Beavis and Butt-head

TOP NEW FLICK

A Perfect World

Wayne's World 2

TOP CLASSIC FLICK

The Graduate

Wayne's World

OFF-SEASON SPORT

In-line skating, golf

Skateboarding, golf

POSTER IN BEDROOM

Alberto Tomba, Cindy Crawford

Eddie Vedder, Cindy Crawford

FUTURE PROFESSION

Lawyer

Lawyer

Knight Errant

The stench remains from Bob Knight's inexcusable behavior last week. Late in a Dec. 7 game against Notre Dame in Bloomington, with his Hoosiers leading by 28 points, Knight became incensed when his son Pat threw a sloppy pass that was intercepted and converted into an Irish basket. In the ensuing timeout Bob grabbed Pat, shoved him into a chair and let go a kick that seemed to be aimed at his son's shin. When fans behind the Indiana bench booed, the coach turned and directed an expletive in their direction. Finally, after the athletic department suspended him for one game (against Tennessee Tech last Friday), Knight wrote an arrogant "apology" that was read, in his absence, to the Assembly Hall crowd. Among other things, Knight wrote, "Given the opportunity to observe each of you, I probably wouldn't agree with all that any of you said or did either."

Knight just doesn't get it. He doesn't realize that as a coach he must be held to a higher standard of conduct than the average person, at least when he's on the bench representing the university. And he doesn't realize how much his actions hurt the people who care about him, some of whom worry that he's destined for a Woody Hayes-like flameout.

A line has finally been drawn in the sand—last week's suspension was the first ever meted out to Knight by IU—but now Indiana AD Clarence Doninger should be even tougher on future incidents. Knight's next offense should result in a month's suspension, and a third should bring an indefinite suspension and mandatory university-supervised counseling.

Any way you cut it, Knight is guilty of a form of abuse that's intolerable, and if he can't mend his ways, he should retire or be fired. Even his defenders realize he's not the only coach who can win big at Indiana.

Not Very Offensive

When the Blue Jays beat the Phillies 15-14 in Game 4 of the 1993 World Series, more than one observer called it a football score. Not so, al least not in the NFL. Any number of pro football teams would kill for that much offense.

On five occasions last weekend NFL games failed to produce as many points as the Blue Jays and Phillies did runs in that Game 4. They were: Patriots 7, Bengals 2; Jets 3, Redskins 0; Buccaneers 13, Bears 10; Bills 10, Eagles 7; Giants 20, Colts 6.

At last glance, however, the NFL was still outscoring soccer by a fairly safe margin.

Tarnished Gold

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