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A Read On the Irish
Richard Hoffer
September 20, 1993
Notre Dame, attacked in a recent book, gave Michigan both chapter and verse
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September 20, 1993

A Read On The Irish

Notre Dame, attacked in a recent book, gave Michigan both chapter and verse

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As you have to say when you say anything about Notre Dame these days, it was one for the book. Somebody's book. Maybe a book Holtz will read. So far, it seems, the only book he has been riffling through besides Krause's is Gray's Anatomy. Holtz has had occasion to read up on clavicles (Powlus), knee injuries (he lost his fastest linebacker, Anthony Peterson, against Northwestern), even symptoms for heart attacks. The week of the Northwestern game he felt chest pains and checked into the hospital. Stress, the doctor said. Probably too many distractions.

But better days are ahead. Notre Dame has shrewdly referred all comments on the book—any book—to a school vice-president, and Holtz's team has stayed beyond the fray. Nightline has come and gone. A time will come, after enough wins like the one over Michigan, when Holtz will not have to repeat his 1993 mantra: "I have not read the book...."

Anyway, there's the new movie Rudy (page 78), the story of Daniel (Rudy) Ruettiger, who fulfilled a dream of playing for the Irish by appearing in a 1975 game for 28 seconds. The movie, shot at Notre Dame, is a tear-in-the-eye-type thing, possibly even a man-or-mouse-type thing. Holtz wanted to take his players to a screening before they faced Michigan but was prevented by NCAA rules. But there was no law against his taking his family, and he was—briefly—effusive. "The scenery," Holtz said, finally allowed to address the arts, "was great."

As far as he's concerned, the dome, last gilded in 1988, still shines.

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