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Baseball
Tim Kurkjian
July 19, 1993
All-Star Break 1951
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July 19, 1993

Baseball

All-Star Break 1951

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Nevertheless, Veeck insists he won't move the team from St. Louis, even though representatives from Baltimore, Los Angeles, Milwaukee and the New York City borough of Queens have expressed interest in the Browns. "Everyone wants to move the Browns from St. Louis but me," says Veeck. "I'm sure they can be built up if exploited properly."

If anyone can do that, it's Veeck, who says—naturally—that he's going to make it fun to go to games at Sportsman's Park. Already there is talk that he will hire baseball clown Max Patkin for entertainment. As always with Veeck, the big question is, What'll he think of next?

Position Available

The search has begun for a new commissioner following the official resignation of Albert (Happy) Chandler on July 15. Chandler quit after having been denied an extension of his contract last winter because of opposition from a minority group of major league owners. (He needed 12 of the 16 votes for his contract to be extended and received only nine.) "I think there are some owners baseball would be just as well off without," Chandler said.

Chandler was named commissioner in 1945, following Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who served for 24 years and ruled over the game with an iron list. The owners elected Chandler in hopes he would work more for their interests, but, in fact, Chandler became more of a "players' commissioner." He established the first pension plan for players. He defended the rights of minor leaguers. He urged major league teams to sign Negro players. None of this was what the owners had expected, so they voted him out. Chandler was furious about the outcome.

Candidates for the job reportedly include Ford Friek, the National League president; Warren Giles, general manager of the Reds; Governor Frank Lausche of Ohio; Gen. Douglas MacArthur; and Gen. Dwight Eisenhower.

Breaking the Code

On the first day after the All-Star break, Yankee righthander Allie Reynolds threw the third no-hitter of the season, beating the Indians 1-0 on Gene Woodling's home run off Bob Feller in the seventh. Eleven days earlier Feller had no-hit the Tigers, winning 2-1 (the first non-shutout no-hitter since the Browns' Bobo Newsom lost to the Red Sox 2-1, in 1934). On May 17 Pirate southpaw Cliff Chambers threw this season's first no-hitter, beating the Braves 3-0 despite walking eight. Chambers was traded to the Cardinals six weeks later.

Reynolds, 32, went against conventional wisdom and talked openly about his no-hitter during the game. "I really knocked these guys off the bench," Reynolds said of his teammates. "I walked in at the end of the seventh, sat next to Ed Lopat and said, 'Hey, pal, do you think I can pitch a no-hitter?' "

In the ninth Reynolds struck out pitcher Bob Lemon, who was pinch-hitting for Feller. Dale Mitchell grounded out to second for the second out. Reynolds got ahead of Bob Avila 0 and 2, and then just missed with a fastball. Said Reynolds later, "I looked at Avila and said, 'Bob, how can you have the nerve to take that kind of pitch at a time like this?' " With a 1-and-2 count, Reynolds tried to throw too hard and fell flat on the mound as the pitch went for ball two. Avila fouled the next two off but then struck out swinging to end the game.

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