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Steinbrenner jumps ship...the earie success of the Trojans...a bad time for Prime Time
Edited by Michael Jaffe
June 03, 1991
VictoriousIn his professional boxing debut, actor Mickey Rourke, who scored a unanimous decision over mechanic Steve Powell, winner of three of his seven previous fights, in a four-round light heavyweight bout, in Fort Lauderdale. Rourke, dressed in oversized gold shorts speckled with shamrocks, was warned repeatedly for low blows, for late hits and for throwing Powell through the ropes as they broke from a clinch. "I don't got no future, really, as a boxer," said Rourke, who made $500 for the fight, "but I do it because I have a good time."
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June 03, 1991

Steinbrenner Jumps Ship...the Earie Success Of The Trojans...a Bad Time For Prime Time

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Victorious
In his professional boxing debut, actor Mickey Rourke, who scored a unanimous decision over mechanic Steve Powell, winner of three of his seven previous fights, in a four-round light heavyweight bout, in Fort Lauderdale. Rourke, dressed in oversized gold shorts speckled with shamrocks, was warned repeatedly for low blows, for late hits and for throwing Powell through the ropes as they broke from a clinch. "I don't got no future, really, as a boxer," said Rourke, who made $500 for the fight, "but I do it because I have a good time."

Arrested
On charges of disorderly conduct and obstruction of an officer, Atlanta Braves outfielder Deion Sanders, after being ticketed for two traffic violations in a two-week span by the same Duluth, Ga., police officer. Sanders, who an hour before the arrest had been notified of his demotion to the Braves' Triple A affiliate in Richmond, was shopping for thank-you cards to send to his teammates when Officer Pat McNaughton recognized Sanders's 1991 Corvette and waited for him to return. According to McNaughton, he told Sanders that the car wasn't properly registered and that it was blocking a fire lane, whereupon Sanders cursed McNaughton and called him "a cracker."

Pierced
The left earlobe of Southern Cal men's tennis coach Dick Leach, 51, after losing a bet to his players. In February, Leach agreed that if his players won the NCAA team championship, he would either wear an earring or let his crew cut grow out. Leach, a relic of the '50s, had guided the Trojans to the semifinals of the NCAA tournament in five of the past eight years without winning a title. On May 21, Southern Cal beat Georgia 5-2 in the NCAA finals. "I might have tried growing out my hair instead," said Leach, "but I'm losing it faster than I'm gaining it."

Stepped Down
As chairman of the American Ship Building Co., in Tampa, George Steinbrenner. Steinbrenner, who said he will now concentrate on running his horse farm and serving as a vice-president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, claimed this was a good time to leave American Shipbuilding because it is headed toward profitability. Oh, really? For the first six months of the current fiscal year, the company showed losses of $3.3 million, a deficit 120% larger than in the same period a year ago.

Died
Former two- and three-mile world-record holder Greg Rice, 75; of a stroke; in River Edge, N.J. Rice was named the best indoor distance runner of all time by The Athletic Congress and while a student at Notre Dame won the 1940 Sullivan Award as the nation's top U.S. amateur athlete. In 1941, Rice failed a draft board physical because of a triple hernia, an affliction he suffered from throughout his career. "I started running as a member of the Boy Scouts," said Rice in 1941. "If my high school in Missoula, Montana, had had a baseball team, I might have forgotten about track."

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