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B.A.S.S. allows its first lass...the Coast Guard's high Heat bill...the perfect Auburn debutant
Edited by Michael Jaffe
May 13, 1991
BurnedBy the Kansas City Police Department, 350,000 Bo Jackson baseball cards. The cards were part of a police-supported antidrug campaign, and about 10,000 of them were distributed to kids shortly after the Royals released Jackson. Last week the remaining cards were torched at the same local steel factory that the police department uses to incinerate contraband guns. Said Royals executive Mike Behymer of the Bo card, which is now worth $15, "We didn't want to see hundreds of Bo Jackson cards in collectors' shops or on the black market."
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May 13, 1991

B.a.s.s. Allows Its First Lass...the Coast Guard's High Heat Bill...the Perfect Auburn Debutant

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Burned
By the Kansas City Police Department, 350,000 Bo Jackson baseball cards. The cards were part of a police-supported antidrug campaign, and about 10,000 of them were distributed to kids shortly after the Royals released Jackson. Last week the remaining cards were torched at the same local steel factory that the police department uses to incinerate contraband guns. Said Royals executive Mike Behymer of the Bo card, which is now worth $15, "We didn't want to see hundreds of Bo Jackson cards in collectors' shops or on the black market."

Perfect
In his first college start, Auburn freshman righthander Jason Johnson, who allowed no base runners in a 14-0, seven-inning win over LaGrange (Ga.) College. Johnson said he plans to make his pregame meal of two sausage-egg-and-cheese biscuits with hash browns a ritual.

Cast
Into the Missouri Invitational, as the first woman to compete in a Bass Anglers Sportsman Society tournament, Vojai Reed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which oversees the host venue, Truman Lake, had threatened to cancel future events if women were not permitted to participate. Last June, Reed, who finished 58th out of 234 entries, had joined other fishermen's wives in asking B.A.S.S. to continue banning women from its tournaments. However, she changed her mind when she found out there wouldn't be a mandatory pairing of partners. Said Reed, "I didn't want to force myself on anyone."

Injured
Philadelphia Phillie outfielder Len Dykstra and catcher Darren Daulton, after Dykstra lost control of his red 1991 Mercedes and struck two trees in Radnor, Pa. Dykstra sustained multiple fractures, including of his right collarbone and his right cheekbone, a punctured lung and a bruised heart. Daulton was treated for a broken left eye socket and a bruised heart. According to police, Dykstra, who was returning with Daulton from teammate John Kruk's bachelor party, was driving while intoxicated.

Stuck
For $138,741.80, the U.S. Coast Guard, which spent that sum to conduct a two-day search for Miami Heat forward Alec Kessler. The Coast Guard, which had been called by Kessler's fianc´┐Że, Rhea Harrelson, after Kessler didn't check in with her during a fishing trip in the Bahamas, dispatched six planes to survey Florida's east coast. Kessler reported his whereabouts after seeing a TV newscast in a bar.

Died
Former University of Mississippi defensive back Chucky Mullins, 21; of complications from a blood clot in his lungs; in Memphis. Mullins, who was paralyzed two years ago after making a tackle against Vanderbilt, rallied Ole Miss students, faculty and friends across racial lines with his courage in the face of adversity. Said university chancellor Gerald Turner, "Chucky's tragedy provided the Ole Miss family an opportunity to display a unity that had developed over the years."

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