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Letters
November 18, 1991
Dashing Emmitt Smith Paul Zimmerman's The 100-Yard Dasher (Oct. 21) was an excellent article about the Cowboys' Emmitt Smith, one of the greatest backs ever to play in the SEC. It's worth noting that Auburn was not on the list of teams that gave up 100 or more yards to Smith. Considering Smith's ability, it was quite an accomplishment for defensive coordinator Wayne Hall and the Tiger defense to hold Smith to fewer than 100 yards in each of the three Auburn-Florida games during the time Smith played for the Gators. Something should be said for the 100-yard stopper.BERNIE BRANNAN Montgomery, Ala.
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November 18, 1991

Letters

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Dashing Emmitt Smith
Paul Zimmerman's The 100-Yard Dasher (Oct. 21) was an excellent article about the Cowboys' Emmitt Smith, one of the greatest backs ever to play in the SEC. It's worth noting that Auburn was not on the list of teams that gave up 100 or more yards to Smith. Considering Smith's ability, it was quite an accomplishment for defensive coordinator Wayne Hall and the Tiger defense to hold Smith to fewer than 100 yards in each of the three Auburn-Florida games during the time Smith played for the Gators. Something should be said for the 100-yard stopper.
BERNIE BRANNAN
Montgomery, Ala.

Athletic Dorms
I fail to understand how anyone can justify athletic dorms (Upstairs, Downstairs, Oct. 14). The most preposterous reason is the one offered by Iowa State coach Jim Walden, who, you say, "predicts that with the demise of the training table, starving scholarship linemen will start stealing steaks out of grocery stores." Come on, Jim! Do starving biology majors steal steaks? Tuba players? Of course they don't. The royal treatment afforded these athletes is part of the problem, not the solution.
DICK MURPHY
Lawton, Okla.

While in college, young adults are expected to learn about freedom and responsibility. Jock dorms shield the select few from learning this precious lesson. The restrictions of jock dorms not only replace parental restrictions but also contain the athletes in a community of other athletes, when they should be getting exposed to a broad spectrum of college students. As Edward Foote, president of Miami, which abolished athletic dorms last year, said in your story, "Part of being a college student is learning how to manage the treasure of freedom.... The point of education is not to control but rather to create an environment that is rich in the opportunity for personal growth. Part of that is to make mistakes—to stay up late or to fail an examination. And to face the consequences."
TRACY L. HUBLER
Upper Montclair, N.J.

Penurious Pirates
The Pirates' claim that they can't afford to keep Bobby Bonilla is crazy (Pirate on the Plank, Oct. 14). If they can afford to pay Andy Van Slyke $4.2 million a year for three years, they can afford Bonilla. Without him, the Bucs have nothing to look forward to in 1992 except a losing season. If owners are not willing to pay for talent, what kind of team do they expect to have?
MIKE FANELLI
Clifton, N.J.

A Worthy 59
Shame on those who belittle Chip Beck's 59 at the Las Vegas International (A Historic Chip, Oct. 21). In the 14 years since Al Geiberger's 59 at the Memphis Classic, the pros have played other pushover courses, but no one has shot a 59. If any score deserves an asterisk, it's Geiberger's. He played under the "lift, clean and place" rule. Beck had no such advantage.
NICHOLAS C. ZALES
Milwaukee

Ticked Off in Toronto
It has been several hours since I read your article about the American League Championship Series (In There! Oct. 21), and I am still seething. What is this? Canada-bashing? While baseball fans here are all too aware of the Blue Jays' shortcomings in postseason play, you have no cause to insult the more than four million fans who set a major league attendance record at the SkyDome by calling us "lame."
VERLYN RUSH YOSHIKI
Markham, Ont.

What About Johnny Bailey?
You say that in the seventh game of his freshman year at Florida, Cowboy running back Emmitt Smith "breezed past 1,000 yards, reaching that milestone earlier in his career than any other runner in college football history." This doesn't come close to the performance of Texas A&I tailback Johnny Bailey, who rushed for more than 200 yards in each of his first four collegiate games in 1986. He had 1,019 yards after five games, at which time he also was averaging 204 yards a game, had scored 10 touchdowns and was averaging 9.3 yards a carry (on 110 attempts). Bailey finished with 6,320 career rushing yards, the collegiate record for all NCAA classifications.

Texas A&I is an NCAA Division II school and has one of the best football traditions in the nation. Bailey, now a running back for the Bears, is another in a long line of NFL players produced by the Javelinas. The list includes Gene Upshaw, Randy Johnson, Darrell Green and Heath Sherman.
FRED NUESCH
Assistant Athletic Director/Media Relations
Texas A&I University
Kingsville, Texas

?We did not include Bailey because, unless otherwise noted, Division I-A is meant when we cite college football records.—ED.

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