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When Mr. Longtail Feasted on Racing
Jim Bolus
November 04, 1991
Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams weren't the only superstars of 1941. Consider the willful Triple Crown champion, Whirlaway
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November 04, 1991

When Mr. Longtail Feasted On Racing

Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams weren't the only superstars of 1941. Consider the willful Triple Crown champion, Whirlaway

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After his four-year racing career (32 wins in 60 races), Whirlaway went to stud at Calumet. In 1950, he was leased for three years to Marcel Boussac, a French textile magnate, who shipped him to Europe to stand at Haras Fresnay-le-Buffard, in Normandy. Boussac later negotiated an outright purchase of the stallion. On April 6, 1953, at the age of 15, Whirlaway died suddenly from a rupture of a nerve tissue moments after he had been bred to a mare. Altogether, he sired 18 stakes winners. Many of his offspring had his name incorporated in theirs, e.g., Whirl Some, Whirl Flower, Whirling Fox, Whirling Bat and Risk a Whirl.

Whirlaway's legacy, however, was not as a sire. Beloved by a legion of fans, he will always be remembered as a champion racehorse—"Mr. Longtail," Mr. Melodrama of the homestretch.

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