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Baseball
Tim Kurkjian
September 16, 1991
From Bad to Worse
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September 16, 1991

Baseball

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Chicago's Other Comeback Kid
Lost in the hoopla over Bo Jackson's comeback—as of Sunday, he was 4 for 19 in his first six games—was the remarkable return of White Sox rookie righthanded pitcher Roberto Hernandez. On Sept. 2, the same night that Jackson returned to the majors, Hernandez made his big league debut. He started and pitched seven innings, allowing only one hit in a 5-1 win over the Royals. His performance came only three months after he underwent an 8� operation to remove two blood clots from his right forearm. At first, Hernandez's doctor, James Yao, thought Hernandez's arm might have to be amputated, but it was saved by transplanting a vein from his right leg into his forearm. "When the doctor told me the day before the operation that I might lose my arm, tears poured out of my eyes," says Hernandez, 26. "He told me if I had kept pitching, there was a very good chance I would have had a stroke. He told me there was a 50-50 chance I would pitch again. At that point I didn't care. I just wanted to keep my arm."

Short Hops...

Brewer infielder Jim Gantner's home run on Sept. 3 against the A's ended the longest active streak of at bats (1,762) without a home run. The homer was Gantner's 45th of his career but his first since 1987. It came during the "home run inning" of a Brewers radio promotion and earned a lucky listener $1,250. Three days later Gantner homered again....

Through Sunday, Phillie pitcher Jose DeJesus had struck out in 13 straight official at bats, one short of the major league record set by the Cubs' Bill Hands in 1968 and equaled by San Diego's Juan Eichelberger in 1980.

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