SI Vault
 
YOUNG AND RICH
Peter King
September 16, 1991
While we don't quite know what to make of Steve Young as an NFL quarterback, we do know this: Robin Leach would like to meet him. As a result of Young's having struck two extraordinarily lucrative deals in the past eight years—he pocketed $5.4 million in two seasons with the Los Angeles Express before the United States Football League called it quits after the 1985 season, and he signed a two-year, $4.5 million deal to remain with the 49ers as a backup to Joe Montana last spring—Young has been one of the best-compensated pro football players over that span.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 16, 1991

Young And Rich

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

While we don't quite know what to make of Steve Young as an NFL quarterback, we do know this: Robin Leach would like to meet him. As a result of Young's having struck two extraordinarily lucrative deals in the past eight years—he pocketed $5.4 million in two seasons with the Los Angeles Express before the United States Football League called it quits after the 1985 season, and he signed a two-year, $4.5 million deal to remain with the 49ers as a backup to Joe Montana last spring—Young has been one of the best-compensated pro football players over that span.

In fact, the five top money-earners between '84 and '91 are quarterbacks. (The highest-paid defensive player in that time is Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor, who has earned $10.15 million.) Here are the total earnings, including cumulative salary and signing and reporting bonuses but excluding incentive bonuses, of the five very rich signal-callers. The information comes from documents obtained from agents with access to NFL Players Association salary surveys.

1