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ALLTIME BEST
Bill Syken
February 09, 2004
Joe Louis, Boxer Arguably history's greatest heavyweight, the Brown Bomber held the title from 1937 to '49. Born in Alabama but raised in Detroit, Louis earned his most storied win in '38 in a politically charged rematch with Max Schmeling of Germany as World War II loomed.
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February 09, 2004

Alltime Best

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Joe Louis, Boxer
Arguably history's greatest heavyweight, the Brown Bomber held the title from 1937 to '49. Born in Alabama but raised in Detroit, Louis earned his most storied win in '38 in a politically charged rematch with Max Schmeling of Germany as World War II loomed.

Earvin (Magic) Johnson, Basketball player
The charismatic guard from Lansing led Michigan State to the 1979 national title over Larry Bird's Indiana State team and the Los Angeles Lakers to five NBA championships. At 6'9" he redefined the point guard position, and his rivalry with Bird revitalized the NBA.

Charlie Gehringer, Baseball player
The Tigers' Hall of Famer was a model of consistency, hitting more than .300 13 times, including a career-high .371 in 1937, when he was named American League MVP. He led AL second basemen in assists seven times and in fielding percentage nine times.

Bennie Oosterbaan, Football player
One of two Wolverines (with Anthony Carter) to be an All-America in football three times (1925 to '27), the receiver from Muskegon twice earned that same honor in basketball and was All-Big Ten in baseball. He coached Michigan to the 1948 national football title.

Hal Newhouser, Baseball player
Playing for his hometown Tigers, he became the only pitcher to win consecutive MVP awards, in 1944, when he went 29-9, and '45, when he was 25-9 with a career-best 1.81 ERA. He won two games in the 1945 World Series against the Chicago Cubs, including Game 7.

Dave DeBusschere, Basketball player
The 6'6" forward was a seven-time All-Star with his hometown Pistons and the New York Knicks and played for two title teams in New York. He was a three-time basketball All-America at the University of Detroit and pitched for two seasons for the Chicago White Sox.

MEMORABLE QUOTE
"If you think my career is a failure because I've never won a national title, you have another thing coming."—FORMER MICHIGAN FOOTBALL COACH BO SCHEMBECHLER, WHO WAS 194-48-5 IN HIS CAREER, WON OR SHARED 13 BIG TEN TITLES AND WENT 11-9-1 AGAINST OHIO STATE

GREATEST MOMENT
Just a year after race riots had torn the city apart, Detroit came together behind the Tigers in 1968. Denny McLain won 31 games during the regular season, but the pitching star of the World Series was portly lefthander Mickey Lolich, who went 3-0 with a 1.67 ERA against the St. Louis Cardinals and outdueled Bob Gibson in Game 7 to give the Tigers their first championship since 1945.

NUMBERS

10
Stanley Cups won by the Red Wings, the most of any U.S. NHL franchise and third most overall, behind Montreal's 23 and Toronto's 13.

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