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Where Will They Be?
Text by Joe Lemire
July 14, 2008
You may not know their names or their faces just yet, but you will—and soon. These 15 teens are among the best in their sports in their age groups, and each one is on track to be a star at a major college, earn professional riches or go for gold at an Olympic Games. (In some cases, maybe all three)
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July 14, 2008

Where Will They Be?

You may not know their names or their faces just yet, but you will—and soon. These 15 teens are among the best in their sports in their age groups, and each one is on track to be a star at a major college, earn professional riches or go for gold at an Olympic Games. (In some cases, maybe all three)

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Taylor Hall
16 CENTER
Kingston, Ont.

Achievements Playing for the Windsor Spitfires of the Ontario Hockey League, 6'1", 180-pound Taylor led all first-year players with 45 goals in 63 games, adding 39 assists. He was named the Canadian Hockey League's Rookie of the Year and helped Canada win gold at this year's under-18 world championships.

Reminiscent of Pavel Bure. The fastest skater in the league, Taylor also has Bure's pure goal-scoring ability. "I'm not an overly physical guy," says Taylor, "but I like to handle the puck and make a lot of fun plays."

Coach's comment "He's not shy about going to the net in traffic with two or three guys on him," says Spitfires coach Bob Boughner. "He's learned how to play without the puck. He was our best defensive forward. By the end [of the season] I could put him on the ice in any situation."

Next step Taylor's December birthday means that he won't be eligible for the NHL draft until 2010. "He'll be a very high first-rounder," says Boughner, who played 10 seasons in the NHL, "if not the first guy."

Ashton Purvis
16 SPRINTER
Oakland

Achievements A junior at Saint Elizabeth High, Ashton holds the national indoor freshman and sophomore records for the 200 meters (with a personal best of 23.53 seconds) and won the event at March's National Scholastic Indoor Championship. Last July she represented the U.S. at the IAAF World Youth Championships in the Czech Republic, finishing seventh in the 100 and fifth in the 200.

Reminiscent of Allyson Felix. Ashton idolizes Felix, a fellow 5'6" sprinter from California who turned heads early in high school, and likes to compare results. So far, so good: Like Felix, as a sophomore she won her first outdoor state title in the 100 and placed second in the 200.

Coach's comment "When you see her, you don't see anything that would wow you physically, but mentally she's just a bull," says Mustangs coach Fred Sims. "She competes to win. She's not bulky or muscular, but she has a tremendous stride. It's not just a long stride—it's a powerful stride. She's able to really drive and strike the ground with some force."

Next step Older sister Julian won the 100 hurdles at the World Youth Championships and will run for Michigan; half sister Amber won the state long jump crown as a sophomore and is bound for Oregon. Ashton will outdo them both. "She gets letters from top schools every day," says Sims. "I have my mailbox at school—and I'm also the head football coach—but those [recruiting] letters go in my box while Ashton has a special section."

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