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IT BELONGED TO THE COACHES
November 11, 1957
No other sport puts quite so much emphasis on the importance of the coach and coaching as football. On days like last Saturday the coaches may even assume greater importance than the players on the field—either through timidity (as with Evashevski of Iowa) or a mixup (Olivar of Yale and Taylor of Stanford). But the saddest coaching news came from Princeton
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November 11, 1957

It Belonged To The Coaches

No other sport puts quite so much emphasis on the importance of the coach and coaching as football. On days like last Saturday the coaches may even assume greater importance than the players on the field—either through timidity (as with Evashevski of Iowa) or a mixup (Olivar of Yale and Taylor of Stanford). But the saddest coaching news came from Princeton

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"MacLean is a strong pass rusher," Olivar said later. "I knew Dartmouth would be throwing long, and I wanted to put as much pressure on the passer as I could." But Hormel, consulting his list of circled numbers indicating the players who had already been sent in during the fourth quarter, waved MacLean back. Then he paced, off 15 yards, putting the ball on the Yale 25. The penalty was for an illegal substitution. MacLean was sent back to the bench, and Pete Riddle, whose number is 83, and who was to have been replaced by MacLean, was not allowed to play, since he had left the field when MacLean appeared. Olivar had to call on a third-string end who provided no rushing at all, and Dartmouth passed its way to the tying touchdown.

Later, Olivar checked the movies of the game, found that MacLean had gone into the game in the third quarter, played on into the fourth and was, indeed, eligible to return. The Dartmouth bench had been keeping check on the Yale substitutions, too, and their records also showed MacLean eligible. In face of this evidence against him, Hormel said, later:

"The boys on the sidelines told me I was wrong, but I had 88 circled, and my conscience wouldn't let me take their word for it. The day a football game can be officiated without mistakes that's the day we can quit. The players holler their numbers from 15 yards away sometimes, so certainly I could have made a mistake. But, according to my record, MacLean was entering for the second time. If I made a mistake, I'm sorry it happened."

Olivar was even sorrier about the error which could cost him the Ivy League title. "It's a bad rule," he said. Football, once a game of strength and speed and agility, has lately been overburdened by rulesmakers. Where once three men could officiate a game, five are needed now. As Olivar might have pointed out, the Yale-Dartmouth game, despite the thrills of its last-minute theatrics, wound up in an inconclusive tie which was clouded by too much unnecessary officiating.

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