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A VIEW HALLOO OF HUNTSMEN
February 22, 1960
In a blaze of flame-red coats and ice-white vests, 75 members of the Masters of Foxhounds Association of America met in Manhattan to conduct the year's business, attend an annual ball and mass for a rare group portrait. Pursued today from coast to coast, the fox has been a favorite quarry for 200 years in the U.S., and the talk of the members, the elite of American fox hunting, was not a far cry from the 18th century. It still concerned the courtesy due farmers, the schooling of horses and the training and breeding of hounds (the membership was cheered this year by the information that American-bred hounds with five-generation pedigrees are now admissible to the English studbook). But more peculiar to these times was talk of the ever-narrowing limits of choice hunting grounds. "George Washington could run to the hounds for miles," said one MFH reflectively. "We're doing well to find a half mile uncluttered with wire fences and housing projects."
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February 22, 1960

A View Halloo Of Huntsmen

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In a blaze of flame-red coats and ice-white vests, 75 members of the Masters of Foxhounds Association of America met in Manhattan to conduct the year's business, attend an annual ball and mass for a rare group portrait. Pursued today from coast to coast, the fox has been a favorite quarry for 200 years in the U.S., and the talk of the members, the elite of American fox hunting, was not a far cry from the 18th century. It still concerned the courtesy due farmers, the schooling of horses and the training and breeding of hounds (the membership was cheered this year by the information that American-bred hounds with five-generation pedigrees are now admissible to the English studbook). But more peculiar to these times was talk of the ever-narrowing limits of choice hunting grounds. "George Washington could run to the hounds for miles," said one MFH reflectively. "We're doing well to find a half mile uncluttered with wire fences and housing projects."

Because U.S. fox hunting is continuing to grow, the MFHs have a natural concern for the fox supply. Their attitude, defined not long ago by an MFHA president: "The last thing we want is to kill a good red fox. Once we find a good one we look for him again and again. If he is hurt we practically go into mourning."

A WHO'S WHO KEY TO AMERICAN MASTERS OF FOXHOUNDS
(see picture on pages 18-19)

Fifty of the delegates to the convention of the Masters of Foxhounds Association of America were from the traditional riding-hunting states of Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New York and Kentucky, another seven from states, north and south, of the original 13. But a hearty complement (18) hailed from farther west—Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Colorado, California—and from Canada. Key to the Masters, past and present, who attended:

1 Torrence Miller, Greensburg, Pa.
2 Alexander Mackay-Smith, White House, Va.
3 Charles N. Kindersley, Todmorden, Ont.
4 Devereux Milburn Jr., Glen Head, N.Y.
5 J. Fife Symington Jr., MFHA secretary-treasurer, Glyndon, Md.
6 William J. Clothier, Phoenixville, Pa.
7 Fletcher Harper, honorary vice-president, The Plains, Va.
8 William Almy Jr., president, South Westport, Mass.
9 Newell J. Ward Jr., first vice-president, Middleburg, Va.
10 John B. H. Carter, Malvern, Pa.
11 Clifford Sifton, Aurora, Ont.
12 Lawrence C. Phipps Jr., Littleton, Colo.
13 Denison B. Hull, Barrington, Ill.
14 J. Stanley Reeve, Haverford, Pa.
15 Joseph Jones, Boston
16 Victor J. McQuade, Millbrook, N.Y.
17 Charles E. Roller Jr., Staunton, Va.
18 Clifton M. Miller, Chestertown, Md.
19 Dr. Richard T. Gilyard, Woodbury, Conn.
20 Charles H. Tompkins Jr., Casanova, Va.
21 Frederick E. Haight II, Litchfield, Conn.
22 T. A. Mohlman, Hinsdale, Ill.
23 William E. Carroll, Rockville, Md.
24 James Pease, Sunset Hills, Va.
25 Paul T. Winter, Altoona, Pa.
26 H. Richard P. Neihoff, Gahanna, Ohio
27 Charles V. Hickox, Glen Head, N.Y.
28 Sherman P. Haight Sr., Litchfield, Conn.
29 George Cole Scott, Richmond, Va.
30 Buford Danner, Zionsville, Ind.
31 Richard Hutchison Jr., Sandy Spring, Md.
32 H. Douglas Paxson, Doylestown, Pa.
33 Sherman P. Haight Jr., Litchfield, Conn.
34 Samuel E. Bogley, Rockville, Md.
35 James B. Orthwin, Defiance, Mo.
36 Wilbur Ross Hubbard, Chestertown, Md.
37 Edward D. Mulligan, Genesee, N.Y.
38 C. Reed Thomas, Sunset Hills, Va.
39 Ernst Mahler, Tryon, N.C.
40 O. M. Fuller, London, Ont.
41 Henry L. Collins Jr., Malvern, Pa.
42 F. C. Wallace, Todmorden, Ont.
43 Edward F. Spears, Lexington, Ky.
44 Daniel M. McKeon, North Salem, N.Y.
45 B. E. Bowen, Waterbury, Conn.
46 William C. Elliott, Media, Pa.
47 Robert Y. White, Gates Mills, Ohio
48 Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Unionville, Pa.
49 William P. Wadsworth, second vice-president, Genesee, N.Y.
50 William F. Dobbs, Glen Head, N.Y.
51 Walter M. Jeffords Jr., Christiana, Pa.
52 G. Allan Burton, Todmorden, Ont
53 Thomas L. Ashbridge III, Doylestown, Pa.
54 Earl S. Hoy, Southern Pines, N.C.
55 George C. Clement, Ligonier, Pa.
56 John G. Howland, Greenwich, Conn.
57 Oliver M. Healey, Atlanta
58 Edward E. Marshall Jr., Doylestown, Pa.
59 Lowry Watkins, Louisville
60 William Wallace Mein, Atherton, Calif.
61 James S. Abrams, Litchfield, Conn.
62 Nathaniel T. Clark, Dover, Mass.
63 John H. Richards Jr., Media, Pa.
64 Dr. Lewis Aitken, Defiance, Mo.
65 William H. Kay Jr., Salt Point, N.Y.
66 Hulburd Johnston, Wadsworth, Ill.
67 Frank E. Richardson Jr., Sewickley, Pa.
68 Charles Green Turner, The Plains, Va.
69 George Jacobsen, Como, Que.
70 C. G. Rice, Hamilton, Mass.
71 Philip L. Bondy, North Salem, N.Y.
72 Hugh B. Sproul Jr., Staunton, Va.
73 Joshua J. D. Derry, Barrington, Ill.
74 Andrew J. Shinkle, Defiance, Mo.
75 Kenneth J. Edwards, Casanova, Va.

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