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THE FIRST 100 YEARS
Dan Jenkins
September 15, 1969
It is recorded that the first intercollegiate football game was held at New Brunswick on Nov. 6, 1869 between Rutgers and Princeton and that Rutgers won 6-4, the scoring and playing rules being considerably different than they are today. What is not known are the names of the heroes of that game, for, surely, in a sense, they were the first All-Americas. It was not until 20 years later that such a list was officially compiled, and since then hundreds of players have been so honored, by newspapers, magazines and, more recently, television. Now, on the 100th anniversary of that first game, the writer boils down the list of All-Americas to 11, the first All-Century team
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September 15, 1969

The First 100 Years

It is recorded that the first intercollegiate football game was held at New Brunswick on Nov. 6, 1869 between Rutgers and Princeton and that Rutgers won 6-4, the scoring and playing rules being considerably different than they are today. What is not known are the names of the heroes of that game, for, surely, in a sense, they were the first All-Americas. It was not until 20 years later that such a list was officially compiled, and since then hundreds of players have been so honored, by newspapers, magazines and, more recently, television. Now, on the 100th anniversary of that first game, the writer boils down the list of All-Americas to 11, the first All-Century team

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What Hutson could do better than Oosterbaan was run with the ball after he caught it. Tall and willowy with immense speed and at least four different gaits, Hutson at Alabama brought all of the dimensions of a pass receiver that we now know of to the game. "I just ran like the devil, and Dixie Howell got the ball there," Hutson says today, but he did more. The Alabama Antelope invented catching "in traffic," he made the end-around a devastating weapon and shifting gears a must. He made multiple faking vital.

While Hutson would catch only six or eight passes in a game, that was a bundle then, and they would be Alabama's key yardage, if not its touchdowns. When he grabbed six passes for 165 yards and two touchdowns in Alabama's victory over Stanford in the 1935 Rose Bowl, he was lavishly labeled "the world's greatest pass-catching, speed-merchant end," and no one has tried to put anyone ahead of him since.

And so we have a team to commemorate a century, a team that can speak well for the lore of a colorful game. We have a Bronko and an Antelope, a Slingin' Sam and a Galloping Ghost. We have passing, running, kicking, receiving and wanton defense. We have speed and enough size. We have winners. But now who do we play? Well, in only 100 more years we'll see.

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