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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 08, 1962
LITTLE MANSirs:This is really an open letter to Mr. Ford Frick: Recently Maury Wills failed to break a record solely because of an artificially imposed game limit set by you. This is the most unfair and illogical dictum that has ever come out of your office.
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October 08, 1962

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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LOVE THAT WOODY
Sirs:
When Woody Hayes (You Love Woody or Hate Him, Sept. 24) first came to Ohio State, I was a senior there and I well remember the reaction on campus when he lost his first game: by the time we walked from the stadium to Fraternity Row on Fifteenth Avenue, someone had erected on a temporarily vacant lot a huge tombstone bearing this epitaph:
Here Lies Woody
1951-1951.

At the time I was heartily in accord with the sentiment, because of Hayes's determination to force his style upon the lettermen returning from a magnificent single-wing team, headed by Vic Janowicz. Roy Terrell is correct in saying that Woody hasn't changed, but people around him have, and I am happy to cast my vote with Woody's growing host of admirers.
NORMAN C. ROETTGER
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

THE GREATEST
Sirs:
An article on the greatest college football players of all time (Sept. 24) that does not include George Wilson of the University of Washington (1922-1925) is like an article of the greatest baseball players of all time that does not include Ty Cobb or Babe Ruth.

Ernie Nevers might possibly have been the greatest but, if so, his margin over George Wilson was very, very slight. This is not hearsay. I played against them.
ROBERT T. MAUTZ
Portland, Ore.

•This magazine welcomes an opinion from a former Oregon right end who is a pretty fair candidate for football, immortality himself.—ED.

VOCABULARY DRILL
Sirs:
Upon reading the University of Michigan corner in your college football issue (Sept, 24) I was deeply humiliated at being called a "Spartan," but amazed at your inaccuracy in an area you should know well, namely the Big Ten. In case it has somehow slipped your collective minds, our not too friendly neighbors to the north—Michigan State—are known as Spartans in most sections of this land and we here in Ann Arbor pride ourselves in being Wolverines.
DAVE ANDREWS
The Michigan Daily
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Sirs:
Spartans—Bah! Humbug!

Wolverines—God bless us every one!
BARBARA KRAUSE BUNBURY
Rockford, Mich.

Sirs:
A wolverine, according to my Webster's, is a "stocky flesh-eating mammal with thick fur, and closely related to the European glutton." In addition it is becoming quite rare in the State of Michigan—almost extinct, you might say, around here anyway.
THOMAS A. DUTCH
East Lansing, Mich.

Sirs:
I have never missed reading your fine magazine but one thing has got to stop!

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