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UNRIVALED
Austin Murphy
August 19, 2008
History and hatred, great games and high stakes, Woody and Bo and the Bowl in the Snow are just some of the reasons that Ohio State-Michigan is the best rivalry in all of football
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August 19, 2008

Unrivaled

History and hatred, great games and high stakes, Woody and Bo and the Bowl in the Snow are just some of the reasons that Ohio State-Michigan is the best rivalry in all of football

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Keep your Michigan gear to a minimum or wait until you are inside the stadium to display it.

Stay with a group.

If verbally harassed by opposing fans, don't take the bait.

Avoid High Street in Columbus.

The memo closed with the suggestion to call 911 "if at any time you feel unsafe," and mentioned that a detachment of "U-M campus police also will be available in Columbus to support our fans."

Do Colorado fans remove their license plates before driving to Lincoln? Are Oregon fans afraid to wear Duck attire around Corvallis? Does Stanford bring its own private militia to Cal? No. When it comes to rivalries, there is Michigan-Ohio State, and there is everyone else.

The death of Schembechler also created a problem for a Columbus-based punk band called...The Dead Schembechlers. The same day Bo passed away, the self-described "best damn punk band in the land" was scheduled to appear at a "Hate Michigan Rally" on North High Street. At a hastily called news conference, lead singer Bo Biafra, best known for such half-sung, half-screamed numbers as Bomb Ann Arbor Now and I Wipe My A— with Wolverine Fur, showed the world a softer, more caring side.

Extending the band's "deepest sympathies and heartfelt prayers to the Schembechler family," Biafra announced that following the band's performance that night, it would change its name (the group is now called The Bastard Sons of Woody!) and would donate the proceeds from the show to a charity "of the Schembechler family's choosing."

After a moment of silence at the Horseshoe the next day the crowd of 105,708 remained standing for a gracious tribute: With footage of the blue-capped Schembechler playing on the scoreboard, the P.A. announcer spoke of the loss of "a legend and an icon...an alumnus and a friend."

This took a bit of the vitriol out of the Buckeyes fans, who were further quieted by the crisp, seven-play, 80-yard drive directed by Chad Henne on the game's opening possession. Henne threw the ball on four of his first six snaps, the first clue that even though Schembechler's spirit hovered over it, this game might not be an homage to him.

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