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For the Record
July 06, 2009
Won By Joey Logano (above), 19, the Lenox Industrial Tools 301, making him the first teenager to win a race in NASCAR's top series. The race, at New Hampshire Motor Speedway, was cut short by rain with 28 of 301 laps left. The rookie, who was making his 20th Sprint Cup start, elected to stay out during a late round of pit stops under threatening skies. He took the lead when Ryan Newman, who also didn't pit, ran out of gas. Logano would have run out, too, had the rain held off. "I guess I'd rather be lucky than good right now," Logano said as he waited for NASCAR officials to call the race, which they eventually did after a brief delay.
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July 06, 2009

For The Record

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Won
By Joey Logano (above), 19, the Lenox Industrial Tools 301, making him the first teenager to win a race in NASCAR's top series. The race, at New Hampshire Motor Speedway, was cut short by rain with 28 of 301 laps left. The rookie, who was making his 20th Sprint Cup start, elected to stay out during a late round of pit stops under threatening skies. He took the lead when Ryan Newman, who also didn't pit, ran out of gas. Logano would have run out, too, had the rain held off. "I guess I'd rather be lucky than good right now," Logano said as he waited for NASCAR officials to call the race, which they eventually did after a brief delay.

Launched
By the Drug Enforcement Administration, an investigation into how Dodgers slugger Manny Ramirez received the performance-enhancing drugs that led to his 50-game suspension. MLB president Bob DuPuy confirmed that the league is cooperating with the probe. According to ESPN, the DEA suspects that a Florida physician prescribed HCG—a drug that can lessen the effects of ending a steroid cycle—for Ramirez, with the doctor's son acting as a go-between. Ramirez, whose suspension is scheduled to end on July 3, played four minor league games last week, going 2 for 7 with one home run.

Accused
By a Rays fan of striking him in a postgame incident, Phillies reliever J.C. Romero. After last Thursday's game, which Philadelphia lost, 25-year-old Robert Eaton says he asked Romero for an autograph outside Tropicana Field. When Romero ignored him, Eaton reportedly made a comment about Romero's recently completed 50-game MLB suspension for using a banned substance. Romero then allegedly slapped Eaton. Asked about the fan's claim, Romero told The Philadelphia Inquirer, "What did he say? That he was drunk and got into a fight? I'm not going to comment on it." Eaton filed a complaint with police; as of Monday no charges had been filed.

Missed
By Cheyenne Woods, the cut in her first pro tournament. The 18-year-old niece of Tiger Woods (SCORECARD, June 1) was five over par in her two rounds at the Wegmans LPGA in Rochester, N.Y., missing the cut by four strokes. With eight holes to play when darkness halted the second round last Friday, Woods was only one over; she triple-bogeyed her second hole the next day and couldn't recover. "I could have made a couple more birdies—or not as many bogeys—but I'm happy," said Woods, who recently finished her freshman season at Wake Forest. She was in the tournament on a sponsor's exemption.

Broken
By Braves righty reliever Jeff Bennett, his left hand after he punched a door near the dugout during Atlanta's 8--4 loss to the Yankees on June 24. A player breaking his hand is not uncommon; what is rare is the player pushing the broken bone back into place and taking the field, which Bennett did. He lasted one more inning before finally telling a team trainer what he had done. Bennett, who gave up one run but also allowed two inherited runners to score, was placed on the 15-day disabled list. "It's good that he cares," said manager Bobby Cox. "It's not good if you break something."

Signed
By three Cowboys offensive linemen, a record deal for their heavy metal band. After just a few months together, the band Free Reign—which, according to the band's MySpace page, has been "kicking ass since March 2009"—was signed by Australian label Riot Entertainment. The band is comprised of (above, from left) guitarist Justin Chapman, who works for an oil company, and the three football players: Cory Procter (drums), Marc Colombo (vocals) and Leonard Davis (bass). An EP is expected to be released in the fall.

Left
The Illinois basketball team, Jeff Jordan (right), the older son of Michael Jordan. Formerly a walk-on, Jordan was given a scholarship midway through last season, in which he averaged 1.0 points and 1.0 assists in 8.4 minutes per game as a sophomore guard. "I have come to the point where I'm ready to focus on life after basketball," he said in a statement. "I will concentrate on earning my degree [in psychology] ... and the opportunities that await upon graduating." Jeffrey's younger brother, Marcus, recently signed a letter of intent to play at Central Florida.

Suspended
From international baseball for two years after testing positive for marijuana at the World Baseball Classic, Cubs catcher Geovany Soto. The reigning NL Rookie of the Year was representing Puerto Rico at the tournament this spring when he failed the test. Major League Baseball does not test for marijuana, so Soto will not be disciplined by the league or by the Cubs. "'I just feel embarrassed," Soto said. "I'm man enough to do stuff, I'm man enough to face it." Soto was not the only player to fail a test at the WBC; Royals pitcher Sidney Ponson, who represented the Netherlands, tested positive for a banned stimulant. Like Soto he was suspended by the International Baseball Federation for two years but will not be suspended by MLB.

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