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November 02, 2009
I was a proud teammate of Kenny Washington's at UCLA in 1939. Our coaches would not travel to cities where the entire squad could not stay in the same hotel. Nonetheless, wherever we went, it didn't take our opponents long to see what fine players were welcome on our team.
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November 02, 2009

Letters

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I was a proud teammate of Kenny Washington's at UCLA in 1939. Our coaches would not travel to cities where the entire squad could not stay in the same hotel. Nonetheless, wherever we went, it didn't take our opponents long to see what fine players were welcome on our team.

Stu McKenzie, Newport Beach, Calif.

What a great piece of writing by Alexander Wolff (The NFL's Jackie Robinson, Oct. 12). I hope some of today's players will read it and understand the trials of those who came before them. That should also not be lost on owners and league officials. While progress has been made, there remains work to do regarding minority hiring for team, front-office and league staffs.

George Gibtin

Elmwood Park, N.J.

What a strange coincidence that the story on Kenny Washington and Woody Strode's breaking the NFL's color barrier was published the same week that Rush Limbaugh was in the news for his attempt to become a partial owner of an NFL franchise—the Rams, the same one that signed Washington and Strode. The last thing the NFL needs is another George Preston Marshall (Marshall Law, Oct. 12) creating unnecessary controversy.

Jed Levine, Forest Hills, N.Y.

You referred to Strode as "ever the supporting actor." Director John Ford gave Strode a starring role in Sergeant Rutledge (1960). Though Strode didn't receive top billing, he played the title character and is unquestionably the star of the movie.

Rick Fooshee, Tenafly, N.J.

Jealous, Perhaps?

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