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Stick Figures
MICHAEL BAMBERGER
February 08, 2010
Want to make a small fortune in the golf business? Start with a large fortune. Having learned that lesson, one SI scribe appeals to the Oracle of Omaha for a takeover
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February 08, 2010

Stick Figures

Want to make a small fortune in the golf business? Start with a large fortune. Having learned that lesson, one SI scribe appeals to the Oracle of Omaha for a takeover

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But then we were stymied. The desperate and the needy had found their way to the E-Club, and the only golfers left were the hopeless (can't sell to them), the übertalented (couldn't sell to them) and the overly proud (a tough crowd).

A note regarding the number 50,000: In the golf biz they say there are 50,000 kooks who will buy one of anything and that you'll know you have a business when you sell unit number 50,001. We were done at 50. Golf Channel rates were getting too expensive—with a robust economy and the Tiger phenomenon—and we called it a day. We liquidated most of the remaining stock. I bought enough clubs to fill that storage unit, and now my stash is down to 723. Hold it, just checked the e-mail. Make that 722.

I realize, Mr. Buffett, that you would not be interested in a golf company that sold one specialty club to the desperate and the needy. But there's a huge potential pool there, if you could sway the overly proud. Gene Sarazen invented the sand wedge and made it popular by winning with it. Look at what Tom Kite did for the lob wedge, what Paul Azinger did for the seven-wood, what Bernhard Langer did for the long putter. Nick Price was a wonderful and generous spokesman for us, but he didn't need the club. He was too good.

What the E-Club needs is a trusted spokesman who will give the club legitimacy by using it in public, in the heat of battle. How about an owner-operator who could be the club's pitchman, too? That, Mr. Buffett, could be you.

Picture this: shot of you in an intense $5 Nassau with, say, Arnold Palmer. You're 20 yards off the 18th green, the match is even, you're chipping with the E-Club. Your shot finishes a foot or two from the hole. You look into the camera and say something like, "The E-Club. It's pretty good." You know, in the tradition of your GEICO spots where the old-timey ad guy holds up a card that reads, MULTI-CAR DISCOUNTS. THEY'RE THE BEE'S KNEES.

Try to contain your excitement.

Thank you for your time, Mr. Buffett. Happy chipping.

Sincerely,

Michael Bamberger

GOLF.COM • SIGOLFNATION.COM

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