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GRACE AND COURAGE
March 10, 2010
She is the most popular personality in her home country, and now Kim Yu-na (right) of South Korea is the undisputed queen of figure skating. Performing a free skate of unparalleled brilliance on Day 14, the 19-year-old landed six triple jumps and effortlessly spun and spiraled her way to the highest score in women's skating history, an astounding 228.56, to win gold at Pacific Coliseum. Her only true challenger, Mao Asada of Japan (top)—the one competitor to defeat Kim in the last two years—opened her free skate with two triple Axels but missed a triple-loop combination and a triple toe and settled for silver. But while the night belonged to Kim, the hearts of the crowd and the host nation were with Canada's Joannie Rochette (above). On Feb. 21, two days before the short program and shortly after arriving in Vancouver to watch her daughter skate, Rochette's mother, Therese, died of a heart attack. Suppressing her grief, Rochette performed flawlessly in the short before dissolving in tears; her score pushed her into third, a position she preserved two nights later with a graceful and poignant free skate that earned her the bronze medal and admiration the world over. "The dream started with my mom," said Rochette. "We shared it together."
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March 10, 2010

Grace And Courage

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She is the most popular personality in her home country, and now Kim Yu-na (right) of South Korea is the undisputed queen of figure skating. Performing a free skate of unparalleled brilliance on Day 14, the 19-year-old landed six triple jumps and effortlessly spun and spiraled her way to the highest score in women's skating history, an astounding 228.56, to win gold at Pacific Coliseum. Her only true challenger, Mao Asada of Japan (top)—the one competitor to defeat Kim in the last two years—opened her free skate with two triple Axels but missed a triple-loop combination and a triple toe and settled for silver. But while the night belonged to Kim, the hearts of the crowd and the host nation were with Canada's Joannie Rochette (above). On Feb. 21, two days before the short program and shortly after arriving in Vancouver to watch her daughter skate, Rochette's mother, Therese, died of a heart attack. Suppressing her grief, Rochette performed flawlessly in the short before dissolving in tears; her score pushed her into third, a position she preserved two nights later with a graceful and poignant free skate that earned her the bronze medal and admiration the world over. "The dream started with my mom," said Rochette. "We shared it together."

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Joannie Rochette 1 0 0
Kim Yu-Na 1 0 0
South Korea 67 0 3
East Asia 75 0 9
Vancouver 169 0 0