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DRESS TO THRILL
March 10, 2010
Olympic outfits are designed to maximize performance and protection—think speedskating's skintight suits and hockey's full body armor. Then there's ice dancing, where athletics and aesthetics meet, sometimes in strange places. For the original-dance portion, in which skaters were to represent the flavor of a particular country, the Pacific Coliseum welcomed hillbillies, Kabuki dancers and others in traditional—if occasionally dubious—costumes. Pushing the envelope of taste and cultural sensitivity, Russia's Oksana Domnina and Maxim Shabalin showcased their interpretation of an Aboriginal look, including faux body paint, red loincloths and strategically placed flora. Those to whom the routine was intended to pay tribute instead took offense. "It's important for people to tread carefully and respectfully when they are depicting somebody else's culture," an Aboriginal leader told The Australian, "and I don't think this performance does." The favored Russians earned only a bronze. Canada's Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir won gold; Meryl White and Charlie Davis of the U.S. took silver.
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March 10, 2010

Dress To Thrill

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Olympic outfits are designed to maximize performance and protection—think speedskating's skintight suits and hockey's full body armor. Then there's ice dancing, where athletics and aesthetics meet, sometimes in strange places. For the original-dance portion, in which skaters were to represent the flavor of a particular country, the Pacific Coliseum welcomed hillbillies, Kabuki dancers and others in traditional—if occasionally dubious—costumes. Pushing the envelope of taste and cultural sensitivity, Russia's Oksana Domnina and Maxim Shabalin showcased their interpretation of an Aboriginal look, including faux body paint, red loincloths and strategically placed flora. Those to whom the routine was intended to pay tribute instead took offense. "It's important for people to tread carefully and respectfully when they are depicting somebody else's culture," an Aboriginal leader told The Australian, "and I don't think this performance does." The favored Russians earned only a bronze. Canada's Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir won gold; Meryl White and Charlie Davis of the U.S. took silver.

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Oksana Domnina 1 0 0
Maxim Shabalin 1 0 0
Charlie Davis 3 0 0
Meryl White 1 0 0
Tessa Virtue 1 0 0