SI Vault
 
CONFESSIONS OF AN AGENT
Josh Luchs
October 18, 2010
This man says he paid thousands of dollars to dozens of college football players. Whatever they needed—a concert ticket, a free trip, a meal—he gave them, all in violation of NCAA rules. Now he says he wants to come clean about his two decades inside the dirtiest business in sports
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 18, 2010

Confessions Of An Agent

This man says he paid thousands of dollars to dozens of college football players. Whatever they needed—a concert ticket, a free trip, a meal—he gave them, all in violation of NCAA rules. Now he says he wants to come clean about his two decades inside the dirtiest business in sports

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

It was before the 1990 football season, and I flew from Los Angeles to Denver and drove to the University of Colorado to try to meet with Kanavis McGhee. He was a big, pass-rushing linebacker who was expected to be a high pick in the 1991 NFL draft. I was 20 years old—the youngest agent ever certified by the NFL Players Association—and had less than a year's experience, but for whatever reason I convinced myself that I had a shot with him.

I figured out where Kanavis lived, drove to his apartment and knocked on the door. No one answered, so I waited. About four hours later, Kanavis finally came home and I bum-rushed him at the door.

"Hey, Kanavis, my name is Josh Luchs. I'm a sports agent, and I flew here from Los Angeles specifically for you," I said. "You're a great player and I came a long way, and I'd really appreciate it if you would sit down and talk to me for a few minutes."

Kanavis said, "Sure, man. Come on in."

We sat on his couch, and I gave him my spiel. I told him about myself and asked him questions, trying to connect with him. After about half an hour, Kanavis said to me, "Josh, you seem like a pretty good guy, can I share something with you?"

"Sure."

"I need some help. My mom lost her job and she's sick and she hasn't been able to make her rent. If I don't come up with $2,500, she is going to get evicted from her apartment."

"I don't know," I said. "Let me think about it. I'll come by tomorrow and let you know."

That night I sat in my hotel room making a list of pros and cons in my head. Sure, it was breaking NCAA rules, but I would be helping Kanavis out. How would I feel if my mom was sick and I didn't have money to help her? I went through this for hours and finally decided to do it. The next morning I went to the bank, pulled out some of my bar mitzvah money, $2,500 in cash, showed up at Kanavis's door and told him, "Kanavis, I gave this a lot of thought, and I want to help you out. I know how I would feel if it was my mom."

"Thank you so much," he said. "You're my boy, man. You're really coming through for me."

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12