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THE TIGHT END TOP 10
Peter King
October 25, 2010
In assembling SI's ranking of the NFL's alltime best at the position, we had to weigh what was most important in each player's era: blocking versus receiving. The list is based on how a tight end dominated in his time period, with extra credit for versatility
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October 25, 2010

The Tight End Top 10

In assembling SI's ranking of the NFL's alltime best at the position, we had to weigh what was most important in each player's era: blocking versus receiving. The list is based on how a tight end dominated in his time period, with extra credit for versatility

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The prototypical receiving tight end, Sharpe was long John Elway's favorite target and shattered all the records at his position until Gonzalez passed him. Sharpe excelled in the postseason: His teams won 12 straight playoff games, including three Super Bowls.

Hall of Fame status: finalist 2009, '10

5. Dave Casper, Raiders, Oilers, Vikings, 1974--84

A tackle for much of his time at Notre Dame, Casper was a devastating blocker with soft hands. His offensive stats (378 catches, 13.8 yards per catch) were pedestrian, but he became a key scoring presence for both Oakland and Houston.

Hall of Fame status: inducted 2002

6. Ozzie Newsome, Browns, 1978--90

One of the first "flex" players—a hybrid wide receiver--tight end—Newsome was his team's most important target for several years and had back-to-back 89-catch seasons in '83 and '84. He never missed a game to injury in 13 seasons.

Hall of Fame status: inducted 1999

7. Kellen Winslow, Chargers, 1979--87

Amazing that at 251 pounds Winslow was so lithe, essentially serving as an extra wide receiver for Dan Fouts for much of their careers. Winslow had three 1,000-yard seasons out of nine years, and his 13-catch, 166-yard performance at Miami in January '82 is the best postseason game by a tight end.

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